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Friday, April 25,2014

Beef Talk

Are 60 percent calving in first 21 days?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Are you at 60 percent? As each operation reviews its herd calving history, a cow is expected to start cycling following birth and prior to the bull arriving in the pasture. Ideally, a cow should cycle within 80 days of calving and then settle with next year’s calf.

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Friday, April 18,2014

Beef Talk

A teachable moment

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
If the weather can impact calving, the phone will ring and people will want to know how calving is going. For years, I was able to detail the daily struggles and offer words of encouragement. Today, the conversation concerns the needs of others because the Dickinson Research Extension Center will not start calving until May 10.

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Friday, March 28,2014

Beef Talk

Do the cows fit the operation?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
One needs to plan, implement, evaluate and replan to stay in touch. That was the essence of the integrated resource management program that was very successful with the help of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the cooperative efforts of the land-grant universities across the U.

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Friday, March 21,2014

Beef Talk

Are your cows ready to rebreed?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Nutritionally, the calf is actively, maybe even aggressively, growing in utero while absorbing the nutrition the cow is consuming and preparing for those first moments of daylight. That daylight will happen when the pregnancy terminates with parturition and, I hope, a live, nursing calf will greet the producer in the near future.

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Friday, March 14,2014

Beef Talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The second level represented those producers who specialized in expanding the population of breeding males and females. Their principle source of income was selling sires and replacement females to the commercial producer.

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Friday, March 7,2014

Beef Talk

Understanding EPD percentile tables is important

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The Dickinson Research Extension Center is using purebred Simmentals, so we would click on “Purebred Simmentals” to see the 2014 purebred Simmental percentile table, then print the table. The table for other breeds will be about the same but may have different labeling on their respective websites and tables.

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Friday, February 14,2014

Beef Talk

CHAPS Herd Benchmarks

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Performance in the beef business is evaluated by reviewing the overall herd. If there are indications that overall herd performance needs to be addressed, the first step is to compare the herd’s performance with a benchmark to gauge what is normal.

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Friday, February 7,2014

Beef Talk

What’s Changing in the Beef Industry?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
What is changing in the beef industry? Reviewing the data from the Cow Herd Appraisal of Performance Software (CHAPS) program, beef herds seem to be fairly constant.

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Friday, January 31,2014

Beef Talk

Live bait is not needed to catch fish

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Catching fish does not always require the use of live bait. In fact, the use of lures of many types and sizes has led to the many storefronts filled with fishing gear. If one is keen on enjoying fly fishing, the artificial fly would more than likely be named and cherished.

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Friday, January 24,2014

Black Ink

Keeping it consistent

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
After living through the summer of 2012, a farmer in my area might be tempted to plant longer season corn. That year it warmed up early, was a hot dry summer that stretched well into fall. The 117-day varieties out-performed the 112-day ones that are common in central Nebraska.

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