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Friday, May 22,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Managerial changes require a review of both the positive and negative. Previous discussion on changing the calving date has resulted in two major points: reducing the cows winter feeding costs and lowering the death loss among newborn calves. Both significantly affect the bottom line.

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Friday, May 15,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
North Dakota Beef Cattle Improvement Association (NDBCIA) members have recorded an average daily gain of 2.52 pounds for calves on summer pasture. This means the 70,000 calves measured through NDBCIAs Cow Herd Appraisal Performance Software (CHAPS) program cumulatively gain on a daily basis 176,400 pounds, 1,764 hundredweight, or roughly 88 tons.

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Friday, May 1,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The beef industry is struggling with data and data tracking. This statement, while met with a wide range of pro and con reaction, does point to the fact that there is slippage occurring. There is a lot of very good data collected, processed and utilized within the beef industry.

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Friday, April 17,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The other day was difficult. The discussion centered on the horse industry as the Dickinson Research Extension Center was reviewing program costs. As the horse program was discussed, the updated costs were noted. Based on a five-year average, the annual cost (direct and overhead expenses) for maintaining a producing mare and nursing foal was $764.

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Friday, April 10,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The pass is open is an expression that is used by residents and travelers in mountainous areas. This year, the saying, the interstate is open would ring a bell, especially given all the changes in travel agendas in the past three to four months.

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Friday, March 6,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
There was a pleasant view as I went to the auction barn the other day. The semitrailer truck was sitting in the parking lot with a load of alfalfa hay. Under many situations, no one would really notice, but the long, drawn-out winter has many producers checking their hay inventory as frequently as the weather forecast.

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Friday, February 27,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Calving time is imminent. This is easy to see as the cows settle into the final weeks of gestation. Cows are a bit slower to get up. Their movement is not as decisive and the placement of feet is more careful. There is a noticeable decrease in the willingness to jockey for the pecking order.

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Friday, February 13,2009

BEEF Talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
A troubling event occurred this past week at an auction barn. There was a feeling of ?not wanting,? but also a feeling of ?that is the way it is.? The auction barn is known as a social center and a place to sell cattle. People share stories and experiences that go along with an industry that is speckled with considerable individualism.

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Friday, January 23,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Last week, the report card on bull S48 was to keep him for the 2009 breeding season. This periodic review is used on all bulls at the time of purchase and periodically throughout a bulls life. The first evaluation of older bulls is for soundness, because putting resources into a bull that has limited breeding capacity is impractical.

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Friday, January 16,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The coffee chat is filled with many opinions about how to buy bulls. The art of buying a bull requires an open mind, homework, and a vision for the future of a producer?s cowherd. For example, we turn to the nutritionists if we want to get a better understanding on how cattle can utilize peas in rations.

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