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Friday, April 23,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
While memories of the calving season are still fresh in your mind (and your calving book is your reference book of choice), now is the time to review this years calving distribution. Evaluate how your management is working.

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Friday, April 9,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Bulls can get sick, too. As a kid, I remember finding our bull dead. The bull was at the end of a grove of trees, the victim of blackleg. Not far away were two dead calves.

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Friday, March 5,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Time does not allow us to absorb everything in one setting. For example, it often is best to read one chapter at a time in a book so one can absorb as much as possible. Bull buying is like reading a good book. It is best to do it one chapter at a time..

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Friday, February 19,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Producers simply do not round up rogue cows and calves, select a calf for harvest, and then invite the neighbors over for supper. Selection processes allow producers to get a feel for the genes a bull carries without having to gamble on the bulls outward appearance.

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Friday, February 12,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
That is a very relevant point. The art of livestock selection started centuries ago when producers realized that if they kept back a particular animal, the progeny of that animal tended to look like that animal. If both the sire and dam of the progeny were of a desirable type, then the offspring tended to be even more desirable.

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Friday, January 29,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The weaning weight EPD reflects the pounds a bull is expected to contribute to his offspring when compared with other bulls in the breed randomly mated to cows within the breed. The real meaning of the number is the difference in genes that affect, in this case, weaning weight.

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Friday, January 22,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The Dickinson Research Extension Center and the North Dakota Beef Cattle Improvement Association (NDBCIA) have rejoined forces to demonstrate and document a heifer development program. The NDBCIA and the center had a similar project in the late 1990s..

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Friday, January 15,2010

BEEF Talk

A New Year’s resolution— Apply what we know

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Granted, this is not a question concerning memory recall but an inquiry into how, as beef producers, we seek to obtain the answers we need to stay in business.

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Friday, January 15,2010

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
The center sold 2-year-old replacement bred heifers and 3-year-old bred cows. The bred heifers marketed in late October weighed 982 pounds and averaged $721 per head. The bred heifers marketed in mid-November weighed 1,105 pounds and averaged $925 per head.

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Thursday, December 31,2009

BEEF talk

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
As the year comes to a close, many thoughts come to mind. These thoughts are embedded with questions. What makes these thoughts unique for each person is a combination of time and place. Questions for older or younger people are anchored at a different point in time.

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