Close
Home » Articles »   By Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
 
 
Friday, December 12,2014

Beef Talk

Prepping for the bull-buying season

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
I am going to say this three times: A producer does not need to know all the mathematics, justifications or scientific “who done it” aspects of breed association expected progeny differences (EPDs). These EPDs are available to all purebred and commercial producers, so use them.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, November 14,2014

Beef Talk

Cull deep enough to find those freeloaders

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Even though cow numbers are down, keeping cows that are not likely to produce a worthy calf next year is fruitless. Culling really is a process of drawing a line in the sand, and those cows that cannot cross the line are sent to market. At the Dickinson Research Extension Center, the line is a combination of managerial chute-side judgments and data.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, October 24,2014

Beef Talk

When a cow is determined to be market beef, sell her

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Current discussions focus on increasing cow numbers, but it may be ill-advised to change cow culling schemes. When a cow is determined to be market beef, sell her.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, September 26,2014

Beef Talk

Cow herd expansion needs land

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
That is a difficult question producers must answer. Just how many more is not an easy number to grasp because most beef operations actually try to keep their carrying capacity or stocking rates stable. Stocking rate, or the cow/calf pairs that inhabit the ranch, are set based on the carrying capacity of the particular type of land.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, September 19,2014

Beef Talk

Have some bulls to cull?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
For many, the bulls are left on pasture and rounded up with the cows and calves as fall progresses. Throughout the summer, various bulls are moved around or brought home. In some cases, they are injured. In other cases, they simply won’t stay in the pasture.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, September 5,2014

Beef Talk

Wet and dry; there is no constant

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Instead of sustainability, what we really may need is an organized response to everpresent change. As cattle producers, how we respond to the environment is key to our survival. The world is covered with water and plants. How we use the plants depends on how consumers look at their plates.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, August 8,2014

Beef Talk

May I borrow your land?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Perhaps the word “aggressive” is too harsh, but there certainly is an interesting relationship that is created when the person who owns or leases the surface of the land meets the person who owns the other side of the coin, which is known as subsurface or mineral rights.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, July 25,2014

Beef Talk

Do the math: Income minus cost equals net return

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
For those who do math, what is $713 minus $537? The answer is $176. Good numbers, especially for the cow/calf producer because the $713 indicates the amount of cash that cows have been able to generate after adjusting for replacements. The $537 indicates the recent costs to keep a cow for the year.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, July 18,2014

Beef Talk

The cow herd struggles to expand

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
For example, I picked up a pamphlet that had the 2013 net returns per acre for several crops in western North Dakota. Based on cash-rented land, there was a spring wheat net return of $55.65 per acre, $77.32 for winter wheat, $28.35 for corn as grain, $93.

Read more Read it in print
Friday, June 27,2014

Beef Talk

Not all bulls are herd bulls

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
At the Dickinson Research Extension Center, seven long, yearling bulls needed to leave. They were neutered and weighed in at 1,179 pounds after a summer on grass. Last fall, they were sent to the feedlot and weighed 1,636 pounds after 88 days on feed. They gained 5.

Read more Read it in print
 
 
User Box (click to open)
 
SEARCH IN WLJ
Sign up for our newsletter!
   
 
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11* 12* 13*
14 15 16* 17 18* 19 20*
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
 
 

© Crow Publications - Any reprint of WLJ stories, except for personal use, without permission, written consent and appropriate attribution is prohibited. 2008 Crow Publications. All rights reserved.