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Friday, January 23,2015

Beef Talk

Buy wisely and spend thriftily

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Dollars are the common denominator. Why be in the beef business without a return to labor and management? With current demand for replacement cattle indicative of a positive industry stance to maintaining and expanding the beef business, now is a good time to ponder some fundamental costs of the business.

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Friday, January 16,2015

Beef Talk

After-the-party blues

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Beef fever, the 2014 attitude. Ever hosted one of those over-the-top parties? They seem to be enjoyable and many people attend.

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Friday, January 9,2015

Beef Talk

Revising the bull pen

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Each year, the Dickinson Research Extension Center reviews the bulls from the previous year to cut back on what bulls need to be overwintered.

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Monday, December 29,2014

Beef Talk

Step 1 for bull buying: Simmental example

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
At the center, values for the current bulls are entered into a simple spreadsheet to allow for easy tracking. The breeding inventory and registration numbers from this past breeding season included five bulls. Their year of birth and registration numbers are: 2013-born bulls, 2790504, 2790544, 2800373 and 2800393; and 2012-born bull, 2669482.

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Friday, December 19,2014

Beef Talk

Step 1 for bull buying: Red Angus example

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
For example, using the center’s Red Angus bulls, the breeding inventory from this past breeding season included five bulls. Their year of birth and registration numbers are: 2013-born bulls, 1617778 and 1617805; 2011-born bulls 1473021 and 1473096; and 2010-born bull 1393949.

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Friday, December 12,2014

Beef Talk

Prepping for the bull-buying season

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
I am going to say this three times: A producer does not need to know all the mathematics, justifications or scientific “who done it” aspects of breed association expected progeny differences (EPDs). These EPDs are available to all purebred and commercial producers, so use them.

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Friday, November 14,2014

Beef Talk

Cull deep enough to find those freeloaders

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Even though cow numbers are down, keeping cows that are not likely to produce a worthy calf next year is fruitless. Culling really is a process of drawing a line in the sand, and those cows that cannot cross the line are sent to market. At the Dickinson Research Extension Center, the line is a combination of managerial chute-side judgments and data.

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Friday, October 24,2014

Beef Talk

When a cow is determined to be market beef, sell her

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
Current discussions focus on increasing cow numbers, but it may be ill-advised to change cow culling schemes. When a cow is determined to be market beef, sell her.

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Friday, September 26,2014

Beef Talk

Cow herd expansion needs land

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
That is a difficult question producers must answer. Just how many more is not an easy number to grasp because most beef operations actually try to keep their carrying capacity or stocking rates stable. Stocking rate, or the cow/calf pairs that inhabit the ranch, are set based on the carrying capacity of the particular type of land.

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Friday, September 19,2014

Beef Talk

Have some bulls to cull?

by Kris Ringwall, North Dakota State University
For many, the bulls are left on pasture and rounded up with the cows and calves as fall progresses. Throughout the summer, various bulls are moved around or brought home. In some cases, they are injured. In other cases, they simply won’t stay in the pasture.

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