Close
Home » Articles »   By WLJ
 
 
Monday, February 14,2005

NCBA policy goes beyond BSE, trade issues

by WLJ
— New Mexico group granted reaffiliation. While BSE and ongoing trade battles with Canada and Japan took a lot of focus of NCBA members during the group’s annual meeting Feb. 1-5 in San Antonio, TX, several other policy objectives were passed on other situations important to U.S. cattle producers. On the marketing side, NCBA members passed policy that still calls for a more producer friendly, voluntary country-of-origin-labeling (COOL) law. Specifically, NCBA members have asked for self certification of origin for livestock producers; protection of personal records; simpler, easier-to-understand COOL retail labels; and tempering of penalties during implementation. Under a similar subject matter, NCBA members also tentatively passed policy calling on the organization to defeat efforts to label beef and beef products as “North American Beef” or any similar language that has the intent of grouping beef from other countries with that from the U.S. Packer ownership of livestock remained a hotbed of debate during the convention, however, existing policy upholding NCBA support of “captive supplies” was renewed. That policy was set aside during the group’s general membership meeting on Saturday, Feb. 5, however. Less than 20 members voted against renewing that packer ownership directive after it was debated for about 10 minutes. The approved packer ownership policy said, “Be it resolved, NCBA oppose federal legislation which would eliminate packer ownership/control of livestock because the legislation would eliminate value based pricing, reduces risk management options and/or eliminates a significant number of buyers of cattle in the U.S.” From a federal lands standpoint, NCBA members voted in favor of removing national grasslands management out from under the U.S. Forest Service (USFS). However, the policy did not state what other agency or agencies should take over that responsibility. Staff from NCBA’s Washington, DC, office said that policy is just stating the simple fact that current management of those lands is unacceptable and that USFS needs to either change their protocol or give it up to somebody that can manage them better. Some NCBA members indicated that the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) might be better suited for that task. From a cattle health aspect, policy was tentatively passed to ask USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) for rules that would allow regionalization of bovine tuberculosis areas within individual states an that cattle from and around the Greater Yellowstone Area be allowed to be shipped across state lines under the auspices of guidelines set forward by the Wyoming Brucellosis Task Force. The longest policy debate during the annual board of directors meeting, held the morning of Feb. 5, was over the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP). After 15 minutes of debate the policy that was unanimously agreed to was “Be it resolved, NCBA opposes whole field enrollment in (CRP) in the next reauthorization of the Farm Bill. Be it further resolved, NCBA shall work to target new CRP acres in riparian corridors, in an effort to increase wildlife habitat and address water and air quality issues. Be it further resolved, NCBA supports giving farmers and ranchers the option of enrolling their expiring CRP acres in an incentive-based Grassland Reserve Program (GRP)-type program dedicated to keeping acreage in grassland for grazing or forage harvest.” Another conservation program policy that was passed was on asking USDA to allow custom operators to participate in the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) in the exact same way that direct operators are allowed. NCBA members will be sent a mail ballot concerning all policy initiatives and directives that were passed by both the board of directors and the general membership. NCBA officials said those ballots will be sent by Feb. 18, and members will have at least a month to send them back. For the mail ballot to be formally utilized by NCBA, 20 percent of the members from four of the association’s seven regions must be returned. One non-policy vote of note happened when the association’s board of directors voted unanimously in favor of allowing the New Mexico Stockgrowers Association (NMSGA) once again be accepted as an affiliate member of NCBA. The state organization voted in favor of leaving NCBA last year, however, at its annual convention last November the group voted to reaffiliate. “This will probably be a yearly occurrence, at least in the near future,” said Caren Cowan, executive vice president for NMSGA.

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

NCBA: Selective Canadian border policy passes

by WLJ
— Ban on 30-month-plus cattle asked for. — Japan trade contingency also requested. Despite hearing new information from a recently commissioned trade team to Canada, members of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) preliminarily passed a policy supporting reentry of Canadian live cattle and an expanded category of Canadian beef into the U.S. starting March 7, but only after USDA agrees to 11 conditions. Under the policy directive, NCBA members asked Washington, DC, lobbyists to tell USDA to open the border to additional Canadian beef and live cattle only if the 11 stipulations were met. Those requirements are: • Prohibit the importation of cattle and beef products from cattle more than 30 months of age; • Assure that all Canadian firewalls to prevent BSE—specifically adherence to a ban on ruminant meat and bone meal (MBM) in ruminant feeds—are functioning properly; • No Canadian feeder cattle be imported until agreement is reached on harmonization of animal health standards between the U.S. and Canada, especially concerning bluetongue and anaplasmosis; • Movement of Canadian cattle into the U.S. be managed to minimize market disruptions; • Fed cattle imported for immediate slaughter must be certified to be less than 30 months of age at the time of importation; • Ban the use of fetal bovine serum from heifers imported for immediate slaughter; • USDA grades and stamps not be allowed on any imported beef product; • Canadian feeder cattle must be branded with a “CAN,” individually identified with an ear tag, certified to be less than 30 months of age at time of slaughter, shipped in sealed trucks from the border directly to approved feedlots, then moved directly in sealed trucks to slaughter; • Feeder heifers from Canada must be spayed; • USDA must work with primary U.S. trading partners to ensure that expanded export access for U.S. beef is not in any way jeopardized by expanded importation of cattle and beef from Canada; and • An agreement to reestablish beef and beef byproduct trade with Japan, South Korea and Mexico, including possible economic sanctions, be formalized before the Canadian border is reopened. The policy directive was unanimously approved by the policy division of NCBA’s board of directors and was unanimously upheld by NCBA members in attendance during the group’s general membership meeting Feb. 5. The unanimous passage of that policy shocked several industry onlookers, particularly as members of a nine-person trade team to Canada reported there was no evidence of a “wall of Canadian cattle” waiting to enter the U.S., the perceived shortcomings of the Canadian feed processing industry were incorrect and human and animal health is not being compromised if Canadian beef and cattle are allowed reentry to the U.S. The nine-member NCBA and university trade contingent, which visited Canadian feedlots, packing houses and feed mills during January, told NCBA members that USDA’s live equivalent figure of two million head of Canadian cattle entering the U.S. annually is greatly overstated and that the figure would most likely be a million head, or possibly less. Homer Buell, cattle producer from Nebraska and member of that trade group, indicated that feedlots in Canada are only 65-70 percent of total capacity and that calf numbers are somewhat restricted due to Canadian producers not calving out as many cows. Tom Field, professor of animal science at Colorado State University, was also on the trade mission to Canada and said that the feed manufacturing industry in that country is not as problematic as earlier reports indicated. He stated that Canadian feed mills all have dedicated production lines for ruminant and non-ruminant feeds, and that many of them will be moving to three dedicated lines, including a production line for only ruminant meat-and-bone meal and other specified risk materials (SRMs). In addition, Field said Canadian feed manufacturers indicated the proposal by the Canadian government to remove ruminant protein from all livestock feeds is a very serious proposal and that doing so would put the U.S. at a very serious competitive disadvantage. Scientifically there is no validity for doing that, however, public perception would be that Canada is getting ahead and addressing consumer concerns better than the U.S., Field indicated. “It’s unfortunate, but doing that would put the U.S. beef industry at a competitive disadvantage,” he said. “We weren’t real encouraging with them on that proposal.” In interviews with several leaders from the four-state group that initially drafted the policy directive, it was indicated that there are still major concerns from “grass roots” cattle producers that Canada’s recent history of having BSE in its cattle herd could unfairly and unnecessarily harm the U.S. industry, and that having additional “safeguards” in place insures the “future competitiveness of U.S. beef in a global beef market.” According to convention sources, the four states that had affiliate groups initiate the 11-point initiative were California, Montana, Texas and Iowa. Affiliates from Kansas, Nebraska, and nine other states put their backing behind the proposal upon presenting it to the group’s board of directors. The directive will be part of a mail ballot sent to all NCBA members on Feb. 17. Members will be asked to approve or reject all policy decisions passed at convention. For the ballot to be valid, there must be a 20 percent return from four of NCBA’s seven regions. The deadline for those ballots to be returned was unknown as of press time last week.

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Long-range planning group named

by WLJ
The 15 newly appointed members of the Beef Industry Long Range Planning Group were announced in San Antonio, TX, last week during the meetings of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board (CBB) and the Board of Directors of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). The Beef Industry Long Range Plan has been a road map for increasing beef demand and enhancing the business climate for cattle and beef. “The current plan was adopted in 2001 and played an important roll in helping the beef industry increase demand an amazing 25 percent since 1998,” said Nelson Curry, 2004 CBB chairman from Paris, KY. The group, representing industry sectors from cow-calf to retail, will conduct its planning work during 2005 and present a recommended plan at the Annual Cattle Industry Convention in February 2006. Members of the planning team are: Chair Dee Lacey, CA; Paul Avery, FL; Donnell Brown, TX; Brad Graham, NC; John Hayes, IL; Jack Hunt, TX; Steve Hunt, MO; Troy Marshall, CO; Jackie Moore, MO; Bill O’Brien, TX.; Robert Rebholtz, ID; Bill Rupp, KS.; Mike Thoren, CO; Richard Waybright, PA; and Roger West, FL. The previous Beef Industry Long Range Plan was developed in 2000. Jan Lyons, 2004 NCBA president from Manhattan, KS, said, “This plan will be a road map for our industry to a profitable future. Success happens when we focus our vision and our resources around one plan, one vision and one voice.” The Long Range Plan has served to focus the dues-funded policy efforts of the NCBA Policy Division as well as the checkoff-funded efforts of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board and the Federation of State Beef Councils Division of NCBA on consumer and business climate demand drivers for cattle and beef. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Merial, Boehringer Ingelheim ink co-marketing deal

by WLJ
Merial and Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. announced a co-marketing agreement for the MERIAL SUREHEALTH calf-preconditioning program that the companies hope will create a more robust offering of eligible products. The SUREHEALTH program features management practices that add value to feeder calves throughout the production chain. “Our goal is to offer the best combination of health protocols and products inside a comprehensive calf-preconditioning program,” says Jim Van Proosdy, Merial senior director of large animal sales. “By combining the product lines of two reputable animal health companies with a set of proven preconditioning protocols developed by the beef industry, we believe that we’re offering the best calf-preconditioning program in this country.” As part of the agreement, the number of qualified products will grow to include brands from both Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica and Merial. These include, Bar-Vac 7/somnus, Bar-Vac 8, Pulmo-guard Pasteurella and Pulmo-guard MpB (Mycoplasma bovis) vaccines; Caliber, Elite, Express, RELIANT and RESPISHIELD brand vaccines; IVOMEC (ivermectin) and EPRINEX (eprinomectin) brand endectocides; and CORID (amprolium), an optional prevention/treatment for coccidiosis. “We are very excited about the SUREHEALTH co-marketing agreement,” says Derek Groff, cattle segment director, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica. “By working together with Merial, veterinarians and producers will both benefit, as these new product options will provide greater flexibility with proven performance-based products. Together we are better able to assist cattle producers in achieving and surpassing their productivity goals.” In total, Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica will market 10 vaccines and Merial will market another 16 cattle products inside the SUREHEALTH program. The 26 products can be mixed and matched as long as they meet the minimum requirements for SUREHEALTH certification. Each company will sell its own brands used inside the program, but both companies’ sales forces will implement the program. “We’re proud to support such an important industry initiative and to see it make economic sense for our customers and their customers,” says Van Ricketts, DVM, manager, Merial Veterinary Professional Services. “In the last four years, calves certified through the SUREHEALTH program have added value to many participants in the beef industry, from the cow/calf producer to the veterinarian, to the livestock marketing center owner to the feedlot.” The SUREHEALTH calf-preconditioning program was introduced in 2001, and says it is the only nationwide veterinarian-certified preconditioning program to offer a 21-day limited warranty on cattle that adhere to program specifications. For further information on the SUREHEALTH program and a full listing of eligible products and protocols, see www.SUREHEALTH.com. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Quasi-federal ID program proposed

by WLJ
The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) is proposing a national animal identification system that would enhance animal health surveillance and give the agriculture industry oversight for the system.“The proposal gives cattlemen one more tool to control their own destinies,” said Allen Bright, cattle producer from Ellsworth, NE, and chairman of NCBA’s Animal ID Commission. “It would provide a reasonable timeline for creating a private system and go a long way toward resolving concerns about confidentiality.” NCBA approved the plan during the Cattle Industry Annual Convention in San Antonio, TX. It must still be approved in the coming weeks by members voting by mail ballots. Key to the proposal would be a multi-species ID service and data base––including cattle, swine and sheep––that would allow USDA and state veterinarian disease surveillance access. Oversight would be provided by livestock industry representatives. The plan would provide a number of avenues for producer participation, directly or through a service provider or data trustee. It would be designed to protect the privacy of producers and be flexible to accommodate differences in production methods. Additionally, NCBA will seek financial incentives, including a tax credit, for participating industry segments, and eventual coordination with international ID systems to prevent disruption of trade. “NCBA members have long recognized the need for an effective animal ID system and have expressed the desire to be intimately involved in the creation and management of such a system,” said Bright. “Cattlemen have been involved in efforts to create a national system for years, and we’re getting closer to implementation of a producer-led system.”

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Product News

by WLJ
BioIngenutiy unveiled Dr. A. Bruce Johnson, Ph.D., known throughout the world as an animal production nutritionist and technical marketing director, has launched BioIngenuity LLC, an animal nutrition and health products management and consulting business. BioIngenuity LLC is designed to assist companies in the areas of research management, product development and strategic planning to bring new livestock production products to market. BioIngenuity LLC can be reached by calling 952/474-4187, www.bioingenuity.com or bjohnson@bioingenuity.com. New roto-spreader trailer mount Today’s new nutrient management regulations require precise application of all waste disposal. The Roto-Spread 362-12 offers complete control with variable hydraulic flow controls. Features include a high-density polyethylene on floor, sidewalls and end gate to prevent rust out. The two 30" diameter high-speed vertical beaters with spinners, flighting and chisel point kickers assure precise application. For more information call 620/225-1142 or visit www.rotomix.com. West Nile virus treatment Colorado Serum Company is proud to introduce a new product for the treatment of West Nile Virus (WNV) in horses called West Nile Virus Antibody, Equine Origin. Unlike any other West Nile Virus antibody treatments, Colorado Serum's new product is concentrated, purified, and ready to use straight from the bottle, offering veterinarians an easy and safe tool in treating horses infected with WNV. Construction of new trailer plant M.H. Eby Inc., which manufactures aluminum semi-trailers for livestock, has begun construction on a new plant in central Iowa. Completion of the facility is scheduled for mid-2005 and will include 33,000 square feet of integrated manufacturing space, along with office space and room for retail sales of parts and equipment. The plant is projected to create 40 new jobs. In addition to its semi-trailers it produces aluminum truck bodies, trailers and agri-transportation equipment for livestock, horse and farm commodities, and retail parts and accessories. Software aids estrus synchronization The Iowa Beef Center (IBC) at Iowa State University (ISU) has released an updated software program to assist producers in making choices in estrus synchronization of their beef herds. The Synch04 edition of the Estrus Synchronization Planner has several new features and is now available to producers. Like past versions of the software, the Synch04 edition assists producers with planning and implementing complicated synchronization programs. This edition also features 22 estrus synchronization systems in three categories, including fixed-timed AI, estrus detect with clean-up AI, and estrus detect AI. A daily activity calendar is generated once producers select their system and breeding dates, and a budgeted cost analysis is performed for the different synchronization systems. The software is available for $35 by contacting the Iowa Beef Center at 515/294-BEEF, or by downloading an order form at www.iowabeefcenter.org. Producers can also learn more about the software at an upcoming webcast, scheduled for Jan. 27. New president at Coast To Coast labs Coast To Coast Laboratories, a company that supplies antimicrobial suppressants to the farming community, is pleased to announce the following promotions. Burt Sookram has been named to the position of president; Tom Stevens has been named to the position of vice president Sales and Marketing East Coast; and Mark Soblom has been named vice president Sales and Marketing West Coast. Muti-use, versatile t-post driver The Man Saver T-Post Driver was developed by Dan Rohrer of Rohrer Manufacturing in response to fence builders who complained about the backbreaking work of driving posts. Rohrer developed the wonder tool in less than a month. The first Man-Saver has been successfully expanded to include a new line of customized, interchangeable sleeves that enable the air-powered post driver to drive almost any wooden or metal shaped posts on the market up to 3-1/2 inches in diameter. Rohrer Manufacturing can manufacture customized sleeves utilizing sample posts provided by customers, ensuring a driver solution for posts of all shapes and sizes. From rocky soil to hardpan, the Man-Saver works in the most difficult soil conditions and driving posts becomes a safe and easy one-person job, for use in agriculture, farming, vineyard and highway. For further information contact Dan Rohrer 541/548-7746 or 800/438-7599, access code 03. Farmstead planning guides available Building on a country acreage or expanding a farm? A new CD-ROM from MWPS, Farmstead Planning Handbook, provides a step-by-step full-color guide through the entire process, from concept to construction. The CD runs on both PC and Macintosh computers. Farmstead Planning Handbook CD-ROM explains and shows how to locate, plan, and build or expand an agricultural site, from a small acreage to a large operation. It also considers relevant related issues such as odor and dust control. More than 100 drawings, photographs, and diagrams plus tables, bulleted lists, and an expansion plan example clarify and enhance the descriptions. Farmstead Planning Handbook CD-ROM and the free 2005 MWPS catalog and other low-cost and free MWPS materials may be ordered online at www.mwpshq.org, by e-mail at mwps@iastate.edu or 800/562-3618 or 515/294-4337. New Web site has parasite information Merial introduces a cutting-edge resource in parasite control education with the launch of IVOMEC.com at www.IVOMEC.us.merial.com. Designed for people involved in the cattle, sheep and swine industries. IVOMEC.com is an easy-access site that accumulates a wealth of resources for those involved in livestock production. IVOMEC brands provide solid parasite protection and treatment for livestock. Merial is committed to continuing to offer endectocide products to the cattle, sheep and swine industries that help achieve better results. For more information see www.IVOMEC.us.merial.com.

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Obits

by WLJ
Willard R. Sparks Willard R. Sparks, a leading professional agricultural economist, successful businessman and commodities trader, died Jan. 30 of throat cancer at his home in Memphis, TN. He was 68. Sparks was widely known for starting the agricultural consulting firm Sparks Cos. Inc., now known as Informa Economics, whose customers included multinationals such as Cargill, General Mills, Quaker and Ralston Purina. His company's daily commodity briefings, market analyses and research studies were among the industry's most widely read. He sold the company to Informa Economics in December 2003. Thomas M. Shuff, an independent broker at the Chicago Board of Trade who worked with Sparks for 27 years, said Sparks was one of the first to use mathematical models and computers to predict commodity prices. "He was a true pioneer and innovator in the field of agricultural commodity analysis," Shuff said. "He was one of the first people to see the need for risk management in ag business and in agriculture." Sparks also played the dominant role in coordinating the first large sale of soybeans and some of the largest U.S. grain sales to the Soviet Union in the 1970s, Shuff said. Sparks was an early shareholder of Refco, Inc., one of the world's largest futures-commission merchants, said Phillip Bennett, president and CEO of Refco Group Limited, LLC, in New York. "He was regarded as a leader in the ag economics advisory world and had a unique relationship with food companies in North America," Bennett said. Sparks was an important partner and share holder of the futures-derivatives business developed by the Refco Group over the last 30 years, Bennett said, and was a significant contributor to Refco's global franchise. Sparks held memberships at the Chicago Board of Trade, the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the Kansas City Board of Trade and the New York Cotton Exchange, where he served on the board of managers for several years.. He actively supported the arts and education. He served on the boards of the Memphis Arts Council, Tennessee Arts Commission, International Brangus Breeders Association and the Tiger Club at the University of Memphis. He once served as chairman of the Board of Visitors at the University of Memphis. Upon his resignation from that position, the university renamed its Bureau of Business and Economic Research in his honor.. Prior to starting Sparks Cos., he had been the president and the director of research and trading at Cool Industry, a major grain and cotton exporter. Sparks was born in Dibble, OK, and spent much of his boyhood working on his family's grain and livestock farm. He earned his bachelor's and master's degrees in agricultural economics from Oklahoma State University and his Ph.D. in agricultural economics from Michigan State University. Dr. Keith E. Gregory Cattle reproduction pioneer Dr. Keith E. Gregory passed away on Sunday, Feb. 6, at the age of 80. Keith had a tremendous influence on beef cattle breeding during the last half of the 20th century including breed and heterosis evaluation, crossbreeding and composite populations, selection for twinning, and multidisciplinary approaches. Keith was honored for his lifetime contributions to animal breeding and genetics by being named to the USDA/ARS Hall of Fame in September 2004. The following is part of the news release about the induction: "After a 43-year career with ARS, Gregory is being recognized for his contributions to beef cattle genetics and breeding. His research has helped shape the selection procedures and breeding systems used to capitalize on the benefits of crossbreeding in the U.S. beef cattle industry. “Gregory was the first director of ARS' Roman L. Hruska U.S. Meat Animal Research Center in Clay Center, Nebraska. Through his leadership and vision, a multidisciplinary research program was established that is now internationally recognized. As a collaborator, Gregory continues to offer guidance on a research project that is investigating the selection of specific cattle for breeding purposes based on those animals' increased likelihood of giving birth to multiple calves." Condolences can be sent to his wife at their home: Mrs. Wanda Gregory, 1834 Home Street Hastings, NE 68901.

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Partners invest in beef promos

by WLJ
According to the Cattlemen’s Beef Board (CBB), the group in charge of administering the nationwide beef checkoff program, foodservice restaurant chains have kicked in $68 for every checkoff dollar invested in recent foodservice/checkoff partnerships. That data was unveiled during the annual cattle industry convention, held Feb. 1-5 in San Antonio, TX. CBB cited just over 20 promotions with national foodservice chains over the past three years that have helped extend the consumer message about beef and resulted in more beef items on restaurant menus. CBB statistics said that between 2002 and 2004, foodservice partners invested approximately $95.7 million in promotions of beef, compared to $1.4 million in checkoff dollars to those programs. “That means that for every checkoff dollar invested in these beef promotions, restaurant chains chipped in $68,” said CBB member Laurie Bryant. “I don’t think there’s anyone who would argue that that’s a pretty impressive leveraging of producers’ investments.” Some of the partnerships pursued via the checkoff in 2004 included joining forces with Pizza Ranch, Quizno’s, RAM International, Domino’s, Taco Bell, Aramark, Arby’s, Ground Round, B.F. Saul, Stuart Andersons, Buckhead Brewery, Quaker Steak & Lube, and Dunkin Donuts. Other new retail checkoff partners during the year included Wal-Mart’’s “Thrillin’ & Grillin’” promotion, Kraft, This Old House magazine, A-1 Steak Sauce, Beringer Wineries, and Borden. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Select Sires names new general manager

by WLJ
Cache Valley/Select Sires has announced the promotion of Randy Hill to general manager. In this role, Hill will oversee the organization's eight-state sales area and will manage more than 30 employees. As general manager, Hill's goals are to offer outstanding service and support to Cache Valley employees and customers, and continue to deliver and increase sales of the industry's best genetics. He will continue to be based at the Cache Valley/Select Sires headquarters in Logan, UT. Employed at Cache Valley/Select Sires for 28 years, Hill was instrumental in establishing beef and dairy estrus-synchronization programs that helped Cache Valley/Select Sires to achieve phenomenal growth. His leadership in these breeding projects improved estrus-synchronization systems, benefitting not only Cache Valley but also the entire Select Sires federation. Ultimately, Hill's performance helped to develop the Select Portfolio of Reproductive Solutions. Through his previously held positions of technician, direct herd salesman and beef marketing coordinator, he also gained valuable experience with direct sales, customer service, and supervision of sales staff, technicians and distributors. Hill succeeds retired Ferron Perkes, who served as Cache Valley's general manager for 26 years. During Perkes' tenure, Cache Valley/Select Sires witnessed a five-fold increase in semen sales. Hill is a graduate of Colorado State University. He and his wife, Cindi, have three children and reside in Smithfield, UT. Cache Valley/Select Sires of Logan is one of 10 farmer owned and controlled cooperatives that are affiliated with Select Sires Inc., headquartered in Plain City, OH. Select Sires Inc. is North America's largest A.I. organization. As the industry leader, it provides highly fertile semen as well as excellence in service and programs to achieve its basic objective of supplying dairy and beef producers with North America's best genetics at a reasonable price. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 14,2005

Sheep herd growth great news

by WLJ
USDA Under Secretary Jim Butler recently unveiled great news to participants at the American Sheep Industry (ASI)/National Lamb Feeders Association Annual Convention when he announced that the number of replacement lambs under one year of age had increased 10 percent over the last year. Butler provided this information from the newly published Sheep and Goats Report released by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS). As of Jan. 1, replacement lambs under one year increased from 702,000 in 2004 to 771,000 in 2005. “Reports of growth in sheep numbers is great news for the entire industry and hits a priority goal of ASI to strengthen our industry,” stated Peter Orwick, ASI executive director. “It is gratifying to see such positive results in the lamb and wool business helped in part by the nine different incentive programs that ASI has provided over the last four years, including the retained breeding ewe-lamb program.” Confirmation of better times for the wool sector also was evident in the NASS report. Over the last 12 months, wool prices have improved. The average price paid for wool sold in 2004 was $0.80 per pound, up from $0.73 per pound last year. The value of U.S. wool sold in 2004 increased six percent. "We are proud that our wool marketing programs implemented in 2001 have helped drive competitive pricing for U.S. wool,” added Orwick. ““We have helped build a customer base in the U.S., as well as internationally, with our wool being exported to a dozen countries around the world.” — WLJ

Read more
 
 
User Box (click to open)
 
SEARCH IN WLJ
Sign up for our newsletter!
   
 
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7* 8* 9 10* 11*
12* 13* 14* 15 16* 17* 18*
19* 20* 21* 22 23 24 25*
26 27* 28 29* 30 31*
 
 

© Crow Publications - Any reprint of WLJ stories, except for personal use, without permission, written consent and appropriate attribution is prohibited. 2008 Crow Publications. All rights reserved.