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Thursday, December 20,2007

BLM seeks pasture lease

by WLJ
Details of BLM’s requirements will be posted in solicitation NAR070052, which is available at www.fbo.gov. Applicants must be registered at www.ccr.gov to be considered for a contract award. The solicitation ends Feb. 8, 2007. BLM manages wild horses and burros as part of its overall multiple-use land management mission. Under the authority of the 1971 Wild Free-Roaming Horses and Burros Act, the Bureau manages and protects these living symbols of the Western spirit while ensuring that population levels are in balance with other public rangeland resources and uses. To achieve this balance, BLM must remove thousands of animals from the range each year to control the size of herds, which have virtually no predators and can double in population every four years. The current free-roaming population of BLM-managed wild horses and burros is about 31,000, which exceeds by some 3,500 the number determined by BLM to be the appropriate management level. Off the range, there are about 28,000 wild horses and burros cared for in either short-term (corral) or long-term (pasture) facilities. All animals in holding are protected by BLM under the 1971 law. After wild horses and burros are removed from the range, the Bureau works to place younger animals into private ownership through adoption. Since 1973, BLM has placed more than 214,000 horses and burros into private care through adoption. Under a December 2004 amendment to the 1971 wild horse law, animals over 10 years old, as well as those passed over for adoption at least three times, are eligible for sale. Since that amendment took effect, BLM has sold more than 2,200 horses and burros. For information about BLM’s wild horse and burro adoption program, see www.wildhorseandburro.blm.gov; for information about the agency’s sale of older wild horses and burros, see www.blm.gov/nhp/spotlight/whb_authority.

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Foreign demand presents opportunity

by WLJ
In 2007, the total value of U.S. farm exports is forecast to reach $77 billion. Exports account for one-quarter of all agricultural cash receipts annually. While addressing a conference during the AFBF’s annual meeting, Crowder acknowledged the importance of farm exports for the national economy. “Trade is fundamental for U.S. agriculture,” Crowder said. “And agriculture is fundamental for U.S. trade.” He listed a series of bilateral and multilateral farm trade negotiations undertaken by the administration in the past year to boost such exchange. Among other accomplishments, he cited the U.S. and trading partners implemented the Central American Free Trade Agreement—Dominican Republic pact, concluded trade treaties with Peru, Panama and Colombia, and also signed agreements with Ukraine and Russia. Crowder called on Congress to ratify such measures promptly. Once ratified, he declared, they “will help level the playing field by affording U.S. growers these markets.” National lawmakers must also extend the president’s trade promotion authority (TPA), a power that facilitates a clear, definitive vote on any new agreements negotiated by the administration. “We need to finish the job by passing them through Congress and getting them so that you can sell your products,” he said. “All trade negotiations ought to have TPA because of the importance of these agreements for agriculture and the U.S. economy in general.” Although talks in the World Trade Organization’s (WTO) Doha Round were suspended last summer, Crowder pointed out that work on an international framework of reciprocal trading rules has continued. “Despite the suspension of the formal talks, we never stopped communicating and we never stopped negotiating. We have a long way to go and we have a lot of differences, but we have not given up. We are just working harder as we go.” Much of the success of trade agreements involves the good faith implementation of their provisions by all signatories. “We will continue to push for fair, science-based import regulations with our partners,” Crowder said. He cited WTO’s rejection of the European Union’s—ban on biotechnology products as an example of how negotiation and effective representation of U.S. interests can achieve results. Other matters must also be addressed. “We know about your frustration with the EU,” he said. “We hear you when you say, ‘We can’t ship our poultry, we can’t ship our beef and we can’t ship our rice to the EU.’ One of our priorities this year will be to enhance our markets for poultry, beef, rice and other products.” Crowder predicted that the “WTO negotiations still hold the most promise for international economic growth and creating new markets for U.S. agricultural products.” He emphasized that the administration will closely assess the benefits of any new trade proposal for U.S. agriculture before agreeing to it. “We will not move until we see other countries come to the table to provide market access,” he said. Ultimately, the goal shared by farmers and ranchers, as well as U.S. negotiators, is to stabilize trading in farm commodities so that it operates on predictable terms. The change in party leadership in Congress as a result of last fall’s elections may not derail pursuit of new trade agreements, Crowder explained. “If we are doing the right thing in bringing these agreements home, I think the Congress will do the right thing to approve them. I am an optimist.” The ambassador repeatedly expressed his appreciation for the support AFBF members have given to U.S. agricultural trade negotiations. “There is a lot of opportunity,” he said. “Your involvement will be critical.”

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Thursday, December 20,2007

National Western names new livestock manager

by WLJ
Aside from serving as the NWSS yard manager for seven years, Angell has also been the area coordinator for the American Polled Hereford Association, head of field services for the Record Stockman newspaper, head of commercial exhibits for the International Arabian Horse Association, and marketing director for Superior Livestock Auctions. Angell’s new responsibilities include scheduling, serving as a liaison with breed associations, and participating in committee meetings and professional show managers’ organizations. Angell’s duties will also include overseeing the Catch-A-Calf contest and the entry process from processing to payout, managing superintendents and seasonal help, hiring judges, negotiating contracts, establishing program guidelines and procedures, and implementing animal care and use policies. “Working as the National Western livestock manager is a great opportunity, giving me new challenges in an industry that I have served in all my life,” Angell said. “I hope to continue the National Western’s tradition of providing a great environment for breeders and exhibitors.” When asked about any goals he might have for the livestock department, Angell responded he hoped to make the department more efficient by merging the stockyards and hill operations. “It is an exciting time in the livestock industry,” said Angell. “Prices are good, it involves good, solid people, technical innovations have exploded, the industry has been able to identify superior genetics and is producing better beef more efficiently.” Angell and his wife Donna, of 36 years, have three children and two grandchildren.

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Beef Checkoff research lays foundation for promotion, information

by WLJ
It isn’t as sexy as a beef ad that sizzles, but the market research that helps determine the success of that ad is just as important to beef producers. Along with research in human nutrition, food safety and product enhancement, market research is one of the research areas funded by the Beef Checkoff Program administered by the Cattlemen’s Beef Board. Market research projects are part of the effort to build beef demand and are managed and coordinated on behalf of the Beef Board and state beef councils by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA). Market research is the basis for program decisions and messages we need to be focused on with the beef checkoff,” according to Monte Reese, Beef Board chief operating officer. “And we’re blessed to have some of the best people in the business working on these challenges.” According to Rick Husted, NCBA executive director of market research, this research provides the “voice of the market” when it comes to decisions made by checkoff program managers. By providing that voice, he says, promotion and information program managers are more effective in reaching the right audiences with the right messages at the right time. After joint promotion and information checkoff committees have identified areas of opportunity and made recommendations, the research helps in the hands-on execution of strategies for checkoff-funded programs. The initial market research effort of any campaign can be crucial to a strategy’s ultimate success, Husted says. According to Husted, “We find out what program managers are trying to accomplish and then go about providing them with the information they’ll need to meet those objectives.” None of this research is conducted for the sake of research, he says; it must clearly support a program or initiative to be of any value. “We need to make sure managers have a good understanding of the market before making program decisions,” Husted says. “And to do that, we need to focus on what’s most important from a knowledge standpoint.” Husted points to beef promotion and advertising as a program area that benefits from market research. “We might start by talking to consumers to find out what it is about beef that they particularly like and to understand any concerns they might have,” he says. While the checkoff purchases several syndicated studies that provide insight into how often people eat beef, “it’s conversations like these that help us understand how people really feel about our product so the team can develop better messages about beef.” Focus groups and other forms of “qualitative” research can help provide the types of insights managers need, he adds. Combining extensive information from syndicated studies with more focused research, different advertising treatments can be created and tested with the appropriate target audiences, helping determine which might be the most effective. Research can also help measure effectiveness of the advertising, Husted says. After campaigns have run, a series of measures provide valuable insight into things like advertising awareness, recall and overall effectiveness. “We go full circle with market research,” he adds. “Depending on what a program needs to be successful we can support just about any effort, from up-front development to post-program assessment. We can also gain competitive insight by measuring how other proteins perform on similar attributes.” The Beef Board’s Reese says there’s another key benefit to conducting market research: It helps beef producers who volunteer on committees debating where checkoff money should be spent pinpoint areas that have the most impact. He points to market research confirming the importance of youth education as a good example. “This research awakened (industry) leaders to the need to address the youth market,” Reese says. “It told us that we need to begin now to communicate with the markets of the future.” In addition to consumer advertising and youth education, checkoff program areas that utilize market research include foodservice (restaurant operators and others in the away-from-home category), retail, nutrition and new product development – which has enjoyed many benefits from market research, according to Reese. Identifying and analyzing advantages seized by competitors is one way the research can be used. “Chicken has made many inroads in convenience and quick food with products like chicken nuggets,” he says. “We haven’t yet found the key to overcoming that advantage, but we will.” According to Husted, even areas with fewer resources understand the value of capturing consumer insights. The checkoff-funded veal program, for example, has been able to leverage checkoff funds effectively to provide insights into how consumers interact with their product. “Even though large-scale market research projects aren’t always an option for the veal program, relatively small budgets can still add considerable value,” Husted says. “It may not answer every question, but it can certainly provide good direction” for veal checkoff program leaders. However deep the research goes, Husted says, if designed and executed properly it should always be viewed as a worthwhile use of resources. “Market research is a relatively small investment when you consider what’s at stake,” he says. “Every program should consider the value of using sound, fact-based research to support decisions.” Getting information into the hands of everyone who will find value from it is important. That’s why the chairs and vice chairs of the various joint beef checkoff committees get together twice a year to evaluate recommendations for market research designed to support upcoming initiatives. This market research working group meets to discuss how research may impact their specific program areas. Market research results are also shared with state beef councils, which use it to help support in-state programs as well as coordinated programs with the Federation of State Beef Councils Division at NCBA. In addition, the information is often packaged and shared at state meetings and other venues with audiences that might include beef producers, who pay the $1-per-head checkoff assessment, or marketers who might use the information to help sell more beef. Dr. Bo Reagan, vice president of research and knowledge management at NCBA, says market research is “one of four legs of the research stool” on which other checkoff-funded programs sit. The other research legs are nutrition, safety and product. These programs are helping define change for the future of the beef industry, he says. “What we do in these research programs helps lead the change that’s talking place, rather than just react to it,” says Reagan. “Market research is a great example of how factual information can be used to set the stage for many demand-building efforts conducted on behalf of beef producers.” “Interpreting consumer behavior and attitudes is only the beginning,” according to Husted. “The end game is to make sure that decisions made on behalf of beef producers are based on fact and, most important, positively influence beef demand.” Reese agrees. “Obviously, the key to building demand for beef is persuading consumers to choose beef,” he says. “But the first step is to understand what is driving that meal choice. Market research is the underpinning of both the strategies of what we do and the tactics on how we do it.”

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Fed and feeder cattle trade unevenly

by WLJ
The cash feedlot trade got going last week after a big break on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) on Wednesday. Prices were trending mostly steady to $1 lower early, with a few packers actually having to pay 25 to 50 cents higher for cattle on Thursday in the five-state area, while in the south, trade last Thursday was called fully steady with the prior week. Texas cattle feeders reported selling 42,000 head in a range of $93.50 to $95. Kansas feeders moved 32,000 head in a price range of $93 to $94, or $147 dressed basis. Colorado feeders sold 5,000 head at $92 to $93.50 and $147 dressed. Nebraska cattle feeders sold 30,000 head in a price range of $92 to $93 and $148-149 dressed. Beef packers came out early last week bidding $92 for cattle, however cattle feeders were holding out for closer to even money until later in the week before trade finally developed on Wednesday. Once cattle feeders saw the break on the CME, they became more willing sellers of cattle, however, many stuck to their guns and in order to get enough cattle bought, packers had to pay up to $95 on Thursday. Trade volume was called good, with little further trade expected. Thursdays’ kill was estimated at 117,000 head, which was 10,000 head below the prior week and 6,000 head below the same day last year. Week-to-date harvest stood at 468,000 head Thursday compared to 385,000 head during the prior holiday-shortened week. Analysts last week said packers were slowing production chains in an effort to get back to positive territory. Andy Gottschalk at HedgersEdge.com said last week that packer margins were negative $39.35 per head although he said it is unlikely gains in boxed beef created by slowed chains will make up the negative territory. “It is unlikely that packers will be able to force values sufficiently on this advance to return margins to a positive position,” Gottschalk said. Several industry analysts said retail consumers were tending toward lower priced proteins in the wake of increased heating bills, holiday credit card payments and creeping gas prices. All of those factors were causing consumers to shy away from higher priced middle meats and creating a sag in boxed beef prices last week, a trend many expect will continue to cause packer losses for at least the next few weeks. The boxed beef market did trade steady slightly higher last week on light to moderate volume. Most trade occurred in the lower priced primals and there was a noticeable weakness in loin primals for most of the week. There was a slight pick up in volume of sales on Wednesday with 491 loads, but trade declined again on Thursday, retreating to a weaker 368 loads moved. At close of business Thursday, the Choice/Select spread settled at $13.63 with Choice trading up 44 cents at $154.47 and Select trading slightly higher, up 19 cents at $140.84. Heavy fund activity spurred by the “Goldman roll,” in which large commodity funds roll funds from nearby contracts to later deferred months, took its toll on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange fed cattle contracts last week. The market was mostly resilient until Wednesday last week, when it dropped as much as 280 points breaking through key support levels in the process and perhaps worsening its fall. Contracts rebounded well on Thursday however, regaining as much as 100 points of the prior day’s losses in the fed cattle contracts. Across the board on Thursday, fed cattle contracts closed in the black, a key measure of the market’s strength. Feeder cattle The feeder markets were mostly mixed last week as light weight feeder cattle and calves sold at prices steady to $2 higher in some instances while heavier cattle sold well below week prior levels. Losses on the CME Wednesday, along with some weakness in cash trade, pulled feeder cattle contracts into negative territory before contracts followed fed cattle contracts higher across the board on Thursday. The USDA crop report showed a significant amount of grain in bins across the country, which moderated some of the week’s gain in grain prices, which declined to $2.12 on Thursday last week and may have helped offset some of the feeder cattle commodity losses in Chicago. In auction market trade, feeder receipts last week were up in many areas which contributed to some slight price weakness. Gains in the corn market along with other grains, poor weather conditions and muddy feedlots in the northern tier also contributed to feeder cattle price weakness. In the southern tier, dry conditions were moderated slightly by some regionally heavy snowfall particularly in parts of Oklahoma, although it did little to abate the drought or help wheat pasture as reports continue to note large numbers coming off wheat grass, which continues to suffer. In Oklahoma City, feeder steers and heifers were called steady to $2 lower, while markets in El Reno, OK, sold feeder steers for $3-4 lower and heifer mates $2-4 lower. The bright spot came in the steer calf category which sold steady throughout the sale. In West Plains, MO, steer calves under 700 lbs. sold as much as $2 higher, while those over 700 lbs. sold steady to $2 lower on what was called uneven trade as buyers sorted through lots to get the cattle they wanted. However, as quality increased, so did the money being offered by the order buyers in attendance. Demand, particularly on the higher quality lots was called good. In Abilene, TX, markets were also mixed. Lightweight steers under 500 lbs. brought prices steady to $1 lower. Steers over 500 lbs. sold steady to $2 lower on good trade and demand. In the northern tier, unseasonably warm conditions have helped feedlots keep feed and health costs in control so far this winter. However, muddy conditions are causing a good number of problems for cattle feeders and in some areas, those problems are reportedly affecting demand for feeder cattle somewhat. However, in comparison to southern markets, those in the north experienced fairly steady sale prices last week The Northern Video Auction on Jan. 7, brought good prices for the more than 30,000 head offered at the Annual Diamond Ring Ranch sale. The offering consisted of top-notch Angus-influenced stockers, feeders and replacements and most were source and age verified. Demand for offered lots was called very good for the Montana, Wyoming and few Dakotas’ cattle. Medium and large 1 steers brought good money for offered lots. For example, 750 head in the 550-570 lb. range brought an average price of $146.25. Heavier steers also sold well, with 2,763 head in the 800-840 lb. range bringing an average price of $111.11. Replacement females also brought good prices for sellers, with buyers willing to pay a premium. Bred 3-6 year-old cows bred for March to May calving brought $1,400-1,500 each. Elsewhere across the northern tier, many auction markets held the first sale of the new year, so trends were still difficult to come by last week. Most noted good strings of quality cattle through the ring and good demand for offered lots. In Dodge City, KS, last week, steers 350-700 lbs. sold for prices called steady to $1 higher, while heavier 700-900 lb. steers sold $1-3 lower and 900-1,050 lb. steers dropped sharply selling $5-6 lower than the prior sale. In La Junta, CO, steer calves under 600 lbs. were called $3-5 higher while those over 600 lbs. sold for steady to $1 higher. Heifer calves also increased. Heifers under 600 lbs. sold $2-3 higher on good active trade and demand.

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Test Reports

by WLJ
The 97 head of bulls on performance test at the Oklahoma Panhandle State Central Testing Station have completed 84 days of the 112 day testing period. They will finish testing Jan. 29 and the top 70 head will sell in the 53rd Annual Performance Tested Bull Sale Feb. 23. Phil Light’s Angus bull 17-4 sired by Bon View New Design 878 leads the junior age bulls with an ADG (Average Daily Gain) of 5.46 pounds. Tim Meier’s Angus bull 21-1 sired by GAR New Design 9391 is second with a gain of 5.38 pounds per day. Two other Phil Light bulls rank third and fourth with ADG’s of 5.24 and 5.02 pounds, respectively. One is a son of Summitcrest Hi Flyer 3B18 and the other is sired by Miller’s Bullseye J373. In the junior pen division, Phil Light’s pen of four Angus is first with an ADG of 4.63 pounds. Leroy Mindemann’s pen of four Angus is second with an ADG of 4.62 pounds and Tim Meier’s pen of four Angus is third with an average gain of 4.52 pounds per day. All four bulls are sons of GAR New Design 9391. The senior age bulls are lead by Larry Weinkauf’s Angus bull 26-3 with an ADG of 6.64 pounds. The bull is sired by SAF New Design K500. An Al Rutledge Angus bull sired by Bon View New Design 1407 is second with an ADG of 5.93 pounds. In third place is another of Larry Weinkauf’s Angus bulls, sired by SAF New Design K500, with a gain of 5.89 pounds per day. Another Al Rutledge bull is at 5.87 pounds per day, tied with Dwight Waugh’s Simmental bull sired by Dew Dot Corn. The Al Rutledge pen of three Angus leads the senior pen division with an ADG of 5.34 pounds. B&M Angus, Edmond, OK, has the second place senior pen with an ADG of 5.22 pounds on three Angus, and Larry Weinkauf’s pen of three Angus is third with an ADG of 4.85 pounds. Phil Light’s pen of four Angus is the most efficient junior pen in feed conversion, requiring 6.2 pounds of as-fed feed per pound of gain. Al Rutledge’s pen of three senior bulls leads this group with an as-fed feed conversion of 6.8 pounds feed per pound of gain. The 53rd Annual OPSU Performance Tested Bull Sale is set for 1:00 p.m., Wednesday, Feb. 23, at the England Activity Building, University Farm, Goodwell, OK. Those interested in the performance reports and a sale catalog can contact Gwen Martin, Animal Science Department, OPSU, 580/349-1500 or e-mail gwen@opsu.edu. NCBTA midterm bull test The Northeast Colorado Bull Test Association’s 29th annual 120-day test officially started on Nov. 1, 2004. Seventy five bulls representing 24 cooperators were weighed Dec. 16 for their 45-day midterm report. Two Angus bulls entered by Kimmel Angus, Stoneham, CO, led all entries with an average daily gain of 5.82 pounds per day. One of the calves was born Jan. 29, and sired by Hoff Limited Edition and had a weight per day of age (WDA) of 3.94 pounds. The other calf in the calving ease division was born Feb. 6, and sired by Bon View New Design 1407 and posted a WDA 3.63 pounds. The average daily gain (ADG) for all bulls on test was 4.35 pounds per day, with an average WDA of 3.18 pounds. Bulls on test represent the following breeds: Simmental, Angus, Angus Calving Ease, Hereford, Red Angus, Crossbred and Limousin. The Black Angus division is having a separate calving ease division. All calving ease bulls must have an actual birth weight of no more than 80 pounds. In addition, they must have a maximum birth weight Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) of +2.5 pounds, respectively. In the Simmental breed group, a purebred son of Drake Stress Free born Feb. 14 and entered by George Rober, Sedgwick, CO, posted an ADG of 5.66 pounds per day and a WDA of 4.02 pounds. Roderick Polled Herefords, Lindon, CO, has the top gaining bull in the Hereford division. Roderick’s bull sired by Star Geronimo 335K and born Feb. 17, posted an ADG of 4.41 pounds per day with a WDA of 3.32 pounds. In the Red Angus division, a son of Schuler 9160 1435L born Mar. 6, entered by the X 7 Ranch Inc., Merino, CO, posted an ADG of .5.03 pounds per day and a WDA of 3.40 pounds. A Balancer bull from Steve Smith Angus, Lehi, UT, born Mar. 27 is leading the crossbred division with an ADG of 4.37 pounds and a WEA of 3.06. This calf is sired by Jaynbee New Design 036. In the Limousin division, a son of Cole 140J born Mar. 25, entered by Fort Bridger Limousin, Fort Bridger, WY, posted an ADG of 4.43 with a WDA of 3.34 pounds. Bulls on test are indexed within their breed groups based on the ADG and WDA ratios, bulls that index 95 or higher are eligible for entry in the NCBTA annual sale. NCBTA will be holding its 29th annual sale at noon on April 2, at NCBTA’s test facilities north of Akron, CO, east of Highway 63. For more information on the weight report contact NCBTA at 970/522-3200, ext. 283.

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Market conditions still tough

by WLJ
Winter weather hit the southern Plains hard last week and hindered the cattle markets in Texas, Oklahoma and Missouri, where ice storms brought shipments to a grinding halt. With the likelihood of more snow in the forecast for late last week and the weekend, some light fed cattle got underway early last Thursday at $140 dressed basis in Nebraska. Prior to the light trade development last week, which wasn’t enough to call a trend, the prior week’s live sales in the South came at $88. In the North, live sales traded at $87-89 and dressed sales were in a range of $138 to $140. Most analysts predicted at least steady trade as a result of the approaching winter storm and despite falling cutout values. There was certainly incentive for feeders to move cattle because of the rising cost of gain and the difficulty of recovering lost weight in icy, muddy feedlots. It appeared last week that boxed beef cutout values had found their near-term top. By mid-week last week, cutout values began to retreat from their unusually high prices. The pullback in prices was widely expected by market analysts after a rapid run-up as a result of lower than normal kill levels and some good demand. In last Thursday’s trade, Choice boxed beef values dropped $1.13 to $153.53. Select cuts declined 18 cents to $141.46. However, those prices were still below last year’s impressive cutout values of $158.02 on the Choice and $143.95 on the Select. Packers were working last week to take advantage of the good market and make some money. HedgersEdge.com estimated packer margins in the black at $18.60 per head last week. However, there was no immediate ramp-up in harvest. Last Thursday’s slaughter volume was only 115,000 head. That number was 8,000 lower than the prior Thursday and 11,000 fewer than a year earlier. For the week-to-date total through last Thursday, packers had slaughtered 458,000 head, 25,000 more than the previous week, but well below the same period in 2006 when 481,000 head were killed by packers. Slaughter weights continue to run above a year ago and despite the higher corn prices being paid by feedlots, there isn’t much hope among analysts that it will directly affect beef production during the year ahead. Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) Analysts Len Steiner and Steve Meyer said last week in comments that USDA anticipates overall beef production to grow at a rate of 2.4 percent this year, reaching 26.7 billion lbs., the third largest supply in history. The largest supply came in 2002, when 27 billion lbs. was marketed. “The latest report projects U.S. beef imports to increase by 207 million pounds, or 6.7 percent in 2007. We suspect that the main reason for this is the expected increase in shipments from Uruguay and possibly increased shipments from Australia and New Zealand should U.S. beef start flowing more freely into Asia. U.S. beef exports are expected to reach 1.44 billion pounds, 290 million pounds or 25 percent more than the previous year,” Meyer and Steiner said. If those numbers prove out, the question becomes: Where will the production come from? Current U.S. cattle numbers are expected to be stagnant when released by USDA on Feb. 3, and cattle on feed pre-report estimates last week were predicting placements well below last year’s high numbers. Livestock Marketing Information Center, based in Denver, CO, predicted the number of cattle on feed as of Jan. 1 would be just 0.2 percent below last year. Placements were predicted to be 18.1 percent below the prior December and marketing numbers were predicted to be 4.8 percent lower than the prior year. On CME, live cattle contracts last Thursday were trading in a narrowly mixed range, with up-front contracts lower and deferred contracts slightly higher. The market was relatively light with many traders awaiting news of cash trade. February contracts were 15 points lower at $92.40 last Thursday. April traded 40 points in the red, settling at $93.55, and June was down 17 points at $89.85. Feeder cattle The Jan. 12 USDA crop production report put a tight lid on the feeder cattle markets last week. The result was much bearish pressure on CME feeder cattle contracts. However, a stall in the upward movement in corn allowed a small rally in the feeder cattle pit last Thursday. After being up the limit for two consecutive days earlier in the week, corn moved slightly higher during the day’s session, but profit-taking in corn held the March contract only 4 cents higher at $4.12 a bushel. Analysts predict the market will continue to move higher toward $4.30 to $4.50 per bushel, however, feeder cattle traders took advantage of the pause. The January contract gained $1.35 in last Thursday's trade, closing the session at $95.27. March was up 80 points at $93.55 and April was 82 cents higher at $95.32. Contracts closed higher across the board at the end of the day last Thursday. However, the overall trend for the week was lower. In comparison, the CME feeder cattle index was off 60 cents on Thursday at $96.69. Many auction markets across the southern tier last week were dark as a result of the ice storm that rolled through, knocking out power and causing transportation problems for producers. Only a few select Texas markets held sales and major markets in Oklahoma were also closed for the week. In Athens, TX, at one of the few operational markets last week, feeder steers and heifers were $3-8 lower, with some instances of as much as $10 lower, although trade and demand were called strong. In Woodward, OK, feeder steers were trading $4-7 lower last Tuesday. Feeder heifers were as much as $4.50-8 lower and steer calves were $4-9 lower. Heifer calves were $8-10 lower. With winter storms in the area and corn futures up, the limit demand was light to moderate for all classes. Farther west in Dodge City, KS, the weather was cold, but lacked the precipitation received farther south. As a result, the market was more active last Thursday, however, steers and heifers in the 300-700 lb. range were not present in enough quantity to provide an accurate market test, but lower undertone was noted. Steers 700-1,000 lbs. were $2-4 lower and heifers from 700 to 900 lbs. were $3-5 lower.   The market in Fort Collins, CO, as a part of its annual National Western Stock Show special sale, sold feeder steers in the 600-800 lb. range for prices $2-4 lower than the previous week. Those lots over 800 lbs. were steady to $1 lower. Steer calves under 600 lbs. sold for instances of $4-7 lower. Heifers under 750 lbs. were $1-3 lower while those over 750 lbs. sold firm. Buyer demand was called best on feeders over 700 lbs. and moderate for all other classes. Several strings of high quality reputation consignments were on offer at the sale. Meanwhile in Greeley, CO, 300-500 lb. steers and heifers sold $3-5 lower. Steers and heifers in the 500-650 lb. class sold $2-3 lower and 650-1,000 lb. steers and heifers sold for steady money. In Hub City, NE, compared to the previous week, feeder steers and heifers sold $2-3 lower with some instances of as much as $4 lower. On the West Coast, in Madras, OR, steers and heifers in the 400-500 lb. class were $8-9 lower, while heifer mates sold as much as $10 lower than the prior week. Steers and heifers in the 500-600 lb. class were $8-11 lower and cattle in the 600-700 lb. range were $5-10 lower. In Galt, CA, a light run of steers and heifers sold for prices steady to $5 lower on steers and heifers under 600 lbs. Feeder steers and heifers over 600 lbs. were steady to $5 lower last week.

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Five Rivers, Certified Angus Beef, Swift join forces

by WLJ
Angus producers in Texas and surrounding states have a new marketing opportunity. Now more than ever, it pays to aim for the Certified Angus Beef (CAB) brand target and feed your load-lot groups at Hartley Feeders. Located in the northern Panhandle near Hartley, TX, and owned by Five Rivers Ranch Cattle Feeding LLC, the feedlot has negotiated a CAB alliance grid with Swift & Co. for delivery at its Dumas, TX, plant from Hartley Feeders. Swift & Co. is a leading packer in high quality branded beef programs. CAB, a non-profit subsidiary of the American Angus Association, operates the world’s largest branded beef company. Five Rivers is the largest cattle feeder in the U.S., marketing nearly 1.5 million cattle per year, mostly on grids to major packers. Its one-time capacity is more than 800,000 head in 10 feedlots from Texas to Idaho, Kansas, Oklahoma and Colorado. The Hartley yard capacity is 73,000 head. If that sounds too big for your feeding interest, consider the company’s focus. “Traditionally, we have kept our heads down and fed cattle as efficiently as possible,” says Five Rivers Vice President of Marketing Luke Lind. “But the industry is changing and we want to lead that change to everyone’s advantage. It’s clear that the competitive advantage goes to relationship marketing and capturing premiums for higher value cattle.” A Five Rivers link with ORIgen demonstrated that improved Angus genetics do perform well, Lind says. “It also showed that not all Angus can hit the target without suffering discounts from crossing the Yield Grade 4 line or poor dressing percentage,” he adds. The new marketing initiative will build on a growing relationship with Angus producers, adding a unique grid with quality incentives and data feedback. Working together, producers can make Texas area Angus cattle grow in value and profitability, Lind says. Hartley Feeders is not about to turn away from its focus on low-cost, efficient production, says manager Gene Lowrey. “We are simply increasing our emphasis on value-added and branded beef opportunities with a goal of sustained premiums for feeding customers.” The opportunity comes largely from the typically low percentage of Choice or better cattle in Texas packing plants, says Tom Brink, Five Rivers senior vice president of cattle ownership and risk management. “That average in Texas is 40 percent, compared to almost 65 percent in Nebraska plants. If we can deliver high-grading cattle in this lower-grade base area, producers will reap the reward. “More specifically, we are doing a lot more sorting to reduce variation,” he adds. “We have to recognize the 30-year trend toward heavier carcass weights is not going to turn around anytime soon. We stand to create more value when we increase our out weights and decrease our ‘non- conforming’ cattle, such as those that are too fat or produce a carcass that is too heavy.” Five Rivers’ Manager of Beef Programs and Operations Analysis, Tony Bryant, says the key is to harvest more cattle at their optimal endpoint. “We will use marginal cost vs. marginal return analysis to get the most out of those high quality cattle,” he says. “It’s exciting to see how CAB brand acceptance is directly correlated to premiums in our data. As the CAB rate varies from 3.26 percent to 13.24 percent, cattle have returned an additional $85/head. Now that we have a program in place, we can improve on that.” Information technology that Five Rivers brings to bear can answer most questions and cross- correlate cattle health, feedyard performance, and carcass characteristics, Bryant adds. That allows producers to fine tune their herds to hit the high quality beef target represented by the CAB brand and the Swift & Co. grid. “This may be the best marketing opportunity for improved Angus cattle in this area,” Lowrey says. The grid pays premiums based on the previous week’s USDA Choice-Select spread, and features a $5/cwt. premium on all CAB-accepted carcasses. Discounts are relatively mild and allow a range of 535- to 1,000-lb. hot carcass weight. How can producers earn these premiums? “We will buy, partner or custom feed your Angus-sired cattle,” Lowrey says. “We need to start with uniform load-lots (enough to fill a 50,000-lb. capacity trailer) of individually identified, healthy cattle. That lets them perform and grade to their full potential,” he says. “We can’t afford to clean up mismanaged cattle, but we will bid aggressively for the right kind when they are healthy.” Hartley Feeders’ preferences/minimum standards: 45 days weaned; 5-way vaccination, twice - Type 1 BVD, Type 2 BVD, IBR, BRSV, PI3; Clostridial vaccination; De-wormer (injectable, pour-on, and/or drench); Not aggressively implanted; Uniform size and weight. For more details, contact Hartley Feeders at 806/365-4666, or e-mail gene.lowrey@fiveriverscattle.com

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Thursday, December 20,2007

Tyson adds two "natural" beef product lines

by WLJ
Tyson Foods, Inc. and Certified Angus Beef LLC (CAB) are teaming up to provide CAB brand Natural beef, the two organizations announced today. Tyson will also soon begin offering Star Ranch Natural Angus Beef. “The CAB brand and Star Ranch Angus Beef have been very successful programs for Tyson and we’re excited to add ‘natural’ product lines to both,” said Noel White, group vice president of Tyson Fresh Meats. “Consumer demand for natural beef is increasing and we believe there’s an opportunity for us to grow with it. While we have every confidence in our traditional beef products, we also believe in giving our customers a choice.” According to Cattle Buyers Weekly, the “natural” beef segment is almost a $1 billion niche of the U.S. beef industry and continues to grow. The beef products will come from cattle that have never received antibiotics or hormones and have been given a 100 percent grass and grain diet. They will be Angus, source verified to birth and fed in “natural” designated feed yards. The Beef Marketing Group (BMG), a cooperative of Kansas and Nebraska feed yards, is the first cattle feeding organization to participate in the initiative. “We believe our efforts to source naturally raised cattle, and following proper animal handling and feeding protocols, will provide consumers with another high quality protein choice,” White said. “In fact, we believe this program will raise the standard for performance in the production and marketing of fresh, natural beef.” For nearly 30 years, the CAB brand has been the benchmark for high quality beef. Only 8 percent of beef meets the CAB brand’s high standards for mouth watering flavor, juiciness and tenderness. Tyson Fresh Meats, formerly known as IBP, Inc., became a licensed CAB packer in 1992. It is the leading supplier of CAB products to the foodservice and retail industries in the U.S. and throughout the world. After 14 years of this successful partnership, it was a natural progression for the two companies to jointly enter the natural beef marketplace. “The joint commitment by BMG, Tyson and CAB to produce CAB brand Natural raises the bar for production standards and product quality for all natural beef brands,” says Jim Riemann, CAB president. “This joint effort gives consumers a choice that will exceed their expectations for natural beef products.” Tyson-supplied CAB brand Natural and Star Ranch Natural products will be available to retail and foodservice customers on a limited basis beginning in February. The products are expected to complement the traditional offering in the retail meat case and also meet the demands of the natural foods retailer.

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Thursday, December 20,2007

2005 National Western Show ResultsLimousin, Gelbvieh

by WLJ
Female division 1, May 4-23, 2004 1st, EXLR Sheza 518P, EXLR Dakota 353G, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 2nd, MAGS Puppet Master, EXLR Dakota 353G, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, MAGS Pink Rose, EXLR Dakota 353G, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 4th, Auto Miss America 836P, Auto American Idol, Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO; 5th, MAGS Perils of Pauline, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Female division 1, April 3-25, 2004 1st, Carrousels Presley, GPFF Blaque Rulon, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, MAGS Puff, Mags Kaptain America, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, Deatsman's Precious 418P, Wulfs Keynote 5474K, Renee Deatsman, Leesburg, IN; 4th, BOJR Priscilla 405P, Auto Real Deal 121M, James Bohi, Wellsville, KS; 5th, Carrousel's Philicia 4396P, TNUH Blue Print 245H, Carrousel Farms, Monroe, WI. Female division 1, Mar. 17-29, 2004 1st, CRSL Polly 4166 P, Movl Rouser, Megan Rolf, LeRoy, KS; 2nd, Sennett Heather 448P, EXLR Moderator 053M, Sennett Cattle Co., Waynetown, IN; 3rd, VL Princess 426P, Tubbb Law Dog 009L, Cheyanne Ratliff, Westphalia, KS; 4th, Deatsman's Polly, EXLR Dakota 353G, Renee Deatsman, Leesburg, IN; 5th, D/S Pearl 412P, EXLR Dakota 353G, Sean Riordan, Reddick, IL. Female division 1, Feb. 15 - Mar. 11, 2004 1st, DVFC Brightstar 326P, JCL Lodestar 27L, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 2nd, Mags Prom Night, MAGS Kaptain America, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, MAGS Princess Warrior, Auto Black Dakota, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 4th, DVFC Liana 330P, GPFF Blaque Rulon, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 5th, O'Briens Priscilla 4200P, Wulfs Jump Short 3519J, O'Brien Farms, Pineville, MO. Champion Female Division 1: DVFC Brightstar 326P, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Reserve Female Division 1: EXLR Sheza 518P, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Female division 2, Feb. 10-29, 2004 1st, Carrousels Purity, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, EXLR Rebeca 715P, Cole Montana Sky 36M, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 3rd, BOHD Proper Lady 576P, MAGS Little Brother, Jacob Bohi, Wellsville, KS; 4th, MAGS Paradise Alley, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 5th, ZWLC Darling 955P, EXLR Dakota 353G, Zach Weldon, Piedmont, OK. Female division 2, Feb. 1-8, 2004 1st, Carrousels Pina Colada, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, Carrousel's Patricia 4338P, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, MLJB Picture Bride, EXLR Latigo 029M, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 4th, Carrousels Precious, WULFS Fanfare 4055F, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 5th, DVFC Penny 217P, EXLR Fully Loaded 419L, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Female division 2, Dec. 30 - Jan. 17, 2004 1st, EXLR Skymere 506P, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 2nd, Carrousels Pretty Special, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 3rd, DVFC Willow 107P, EXLR Fully Loaded 419L, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 4th, MAGS Pretty Looker, JCL Baxter, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 5th, DVFC Chocolate Bar 110, EXLR Fully Loaded 419L, Lacy Stephens, Statham, GA. Champion Female Division 2: Carrousels Purity, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Female Division 2: EXLR Skymere 506P, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Female division 3, Nov. 12 - Dec. 5, 2003 1st, Auto Demetra 264N, Auto American Idol, Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO; 2nd, JCL Red Pepper, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK; 3rd, FRDB Nebula 301N, FRDA Kryptonite, Bolton Ferda, Medford, OK; 4th, OKF New Demand, EXLR Latigo 029M, Oak Knoll Farm, Clinton, SC. Female division 3, Sept. 13 - Oct. 19, 2003 1st, EXLR Jenna 579N, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 2nd, JCL Sara, EXLR Dakota 353G, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK; 3rd, LNSR NORA, DJ Gentleman in Black, Shipman Cattle Co., Girard, KS; 4th, Auto Deanna 249N, Auto American Idol, Pinegar Limousin of Springfield, MO. Champion Female Division 3: EXLR Jenna 579N, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Reserve Female Division 3: Auto Demetra 264N, Pinegar Limousin, Springfield, MO. Female division 4, May 1 - June 4, 2003 1st, MAGS Nutty Chocolate, DJ Gentleman in Black, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 2nd, Sennett Wendy 348N, EXLR Polled Benchmark 709G, Mallory Bannon, Ladoga, IN; 3rd, MDPL Night Games 64N, WULFS Guardian 5074G, Megan Perry, Grove, OK; 4th, MAGS Norma Rae, Taylor Wallace, Kalamath Falls, OR. Champion Female Division 4: MAGS Nutty Chocolate, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Reserve Female Division 4: Sennett Wendy 348N, Mallory Bannon, Ladoga, IN. Female division 5, Mar. 22 - April 20, 2003 1st, EXLR Lubly 7127N, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 2nd, MAGS Norma Rae 198N, EXLR Dakota 353G, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, DVFC Watch Me Work 432N, DVFC Cookie Monster 108H, Lacy Stephens, Statham, GA; 4th, EXLR Jenna 7101N, WULFS Guardian 5074G, Precision Genetics Cattle Co., Wheatland, CA; 5th, Auto Nalanie 217N, WULFS Guardian 5074G, James Bohi, Wellsville, KS. Female division 5, Mar. 1, 2003 - Mar. 7, 2003 1st, MAGS Nikki, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 2nd, TUBB Rulon 329N, GPFF Blaque Rulon, Morgan Ratliff, Westphalia, KS; 3rd, MAGS NYSSA, LVLS Secret Weapon 4408K, Cori Wallace, Klamath Falls, OR. Female division 5, Jan. 11 - Feb. 25, 2003 1st, MAGS Night Creature, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 2nd, MAGS Nepal, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, CIC Naples 28N, EXLR Dakota 353G, Country Inn Cattle Co., Klamath Falls, OR. Champion Female Division 5: EXLR Lubly 7127N, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Reserve Female Division 5: MAGS Norma Rae 198N, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Female division 6, Oct. 30, 2002 - Nov. 10, 2002 1st, DVFC Just As Luvly 1112M, WULFS Handyman 4253H, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 2nd, DL Martha 47M, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Blair Davis, Brownwood, TX. Female division 6 Tentative, Oct. 30 - Nov. 10, 2002 1st, Win Vue Blaque Ruby 273, GPFF Blaque Rulon, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 2nd, ML Maxine, EXLR Dakota 353G, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Champion Female Division 6: DVFC Just As Luvly 1112M, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Reserve Champion Female Division 6: Win Vue Blaque Ruby 273, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Female division cow/calf pair 1st, MAGS Maizie, EXLR Dakota 353G, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Female division cow/calf pair 1st, LFL Betty Jo 873 H, Tyre Dean 17B, Lawrence Family Limousin, Anton, TX. Female division cow/calf pair 1st, RMKR Black Princess, PJBB,706V, Rebecca Ferda, Medford, OK. Champion Cow/Calf: MAGS Maizie, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Reserve Champion Cow/Calf: LFL Betty Jo 873 H, Lawrence Family Limousin, Anton, TX. Grand Champion Female: EXLR Lubly 7127N, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Reserve Grand Female: MAGS Norma Rae 198N, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Bull division 1, April 29 - May 6, 2004 1st, DVFC TILT 520P, EXLR Dakota 353G, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Bull division 1 , Mar. 1-30, 2004 1st, Carrousels Point Blank, GPFF Blaque Rulon, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, DVFC Boyce 320P, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 3rd, TLIM Presley, TLIM Murray, Timperley Limousin, Tekamah, NE. Bull division 1, Jan. 26 - Feb. 21, 2004 1st, JCL Godfather, JCL Black Monster, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK; 2nd, JCL Made in America, MAGS Kaptain America, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK; 3rd, EXLR Paragon 702P, Carrousels, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Champion Bull Division 1: Carrousels Point Blank, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Bull Division 1: JCL Godfather, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK. Bull division 2, Nov. 26, 2003 1st, DVFC Undeniable 1124N, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Bull division 2, Sept. 16, 2003 1st, JCL Gold Mine, EXLR Dakota 353G, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK. Champion Bull Division 2: JCL Gold Mine, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK. Reserve Bull Division 2: DVFC Undeniable 1124N, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Bull division 3, May 11, 2003 1st, MAGS Norbert, MDRC Tubb Lucky Strike, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Champion Bull Division 3: MAGS Norbert, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Bull division 4, Mar. 10-26, 2003 1st, EXLR Native 7133N, EXLR Judo 459J, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN; 2nd, EF Open Range 307N, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 3rd, O'Briens Nathaniel, WULFS Jump Shot, O'Brien Farms of Pineville, MO. Bull division 4, Jan. 6 - Feb. 27, 2003 1st, Carrousels NASDAQ, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, JCL Black Okie, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Eden Run Farms, Inc., Welch, OK;3rd, CIC Navigator 212N, Mine Polled Drydock, Vicki Avery, Dallas, OR. Champion Bull Division 4: Carrousels NASDAQ, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Champion Bull Division 4: EXLR Native 7133N, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Bull division 5, Sept. 20, 2002 1st, EF Main Stay, Auto Black Dakota 129J, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Champion Bull Division 5: EF Main Stay, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Bull division 6, Mar. 16, 2002 1st, EXLR Marlin 7115M, EXLR Polled Benchmark 709G, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Champion Bull Division 6: EXLR Marlin 7115M, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK. Champion Bull: Carrousels NASDAQ, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Grand Champion Bull: EF Main Stay, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Produce of dam 1st, Deer Valley Farm, Fayetteville, TN. Junior get-of-sire 1st, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Senior get-of-sire 1st, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Breeders best five head 1st, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 2nd, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Premier breeder award 1st, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK Premier exhibitor award 1st, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO Carload Bulls Limousin Carload 8 yearling bulls, calved between Jan. 1 - April 30, 2003 1st, Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN Carload 8 yearling bulls, calved Sept. 1 - Dec. 31, 2003 1st, Express Ranches, Yukon, OK Carload 10 bull calves, calved Feb. 15 - April 2, 2004 1st, Coleman Limousin Ranch Inc., Charlo, MT Carload 10 bull calves, calved Feb. 15 - Mar. 31, 2004 1st, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO; 2nd Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 3rd Symens Bros. Limousin, Amherst, SD. Carload 10 bull calves, calved April 1 - May 31, 2004 1st, Wulf Limousin of Morris, MN; 2nd Running Creek Ranch of Elizabeth, CO Grand Champion Carload Limousin Bulls: 1st Magness Land & Cattle of Platteville, CO. Reserve Grand Champion Carload Limousin Bulls: 2nd Coleman Limousin Ranch Inc., Charlo, MT. Pen Show Limousin Pen of three bulls, calved Jan. 1 - April 30, 2003 1st, Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Pen of three bulls, calved May 1 - Aug. 31, 2003 1st, Running Creek Ranch, Elizabeth, CO. Champion Pen of Three Bulls - Division 1: 1st Magness Land & Cattle, Platteville, CO. Reserve Champion Pen of Three Bulls - Division 1: 2nd Running Creek Ranch, Elizabeth, CO. Pen of three bulls, calved Jan. 1 - Feb. 14, 2004 1st, Etherton Farms, Dawson, IL; 2nd Express Ranches, Yukon, OK; 3rd Lonely Valley Limousin, Creston, NE. Pen of three bulls, calved Jan. 1 - Feb. 14, 2004 1st, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 3rd, Lonely Valley Limousin, Creston, NE. Pen of three bulls, calved between Feb 15 - Mar. 31, 2004 1st, Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN; 2nd, Lund Limousin, Cottonwood, MN; 3rd, Hunt Limousin Ranch, Oxford, NE; 4th, Key Bar Ranch, Glendo, WY. Champion Pen of Three Bulls - Division 2: 1st Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Champion Pen of Three Bulls - Division 2: 2nd Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Pen of three bulls, calved Feb. 15 - Mar. 31, 2004 1st, Potterosa Limousin Farms, Redwood Falls, MN; 2nd, Petersons L 7 Bar Limousin, Pukwana, SD; 3rd, Rock Creek Outfitters, Hinsdale, MT. Pen of three bulls, calved April 1 - May 31, 2004 1st, Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI; 2nd, Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN; 3rd, Running Creek Ranch, Elizabeth, CO; 4th, Symens Bros Limousin, Amherst, SD. Pen of three bulls, calved April 1 - May 31, 2004 1st, Sennett Cattle Co., Waynetown, IN; 2nd, Wulf Limousin, Morris, MN Champion Pen of Three Bulls - Division 3: Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Champion Pen of Three Bulls - Division 3: Potterosa Limousin Farms, Redwood Falls, MN. Champion Pen of Three Bulls: Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Reserve Champion Pen of Three Bulls: Carrousel Farms, Mineral Point, WI. Gelbvieh Heifer calves, May 6-10, 2004 1st, GRU Ms Penny, Gatz Complete Pa, Grund Beef Genetics, Sharon Springs, KS; 2nd, PCCI Ms Ice 4316P, PCCI Black Ice 001, Pearson Cattle Co. Inc., Lake City, SD. Heifer calves, April 2-21, 2004 1st, 3G Cowgirl Persistence, SLC Freedom 178F, 3 G Ranch, Kendallville, IN; 2nd, BEAS 4002P, LWHF Fearless, Shad Ludemann, Ft. Pierre, SD; 3rd, BEA Julianne 4003P, JGW 3R 178F Freed, Beastrom Gelbveih, Pierre, SD; 4th, TJB Lady Granite 496 P ET, TJB Jagermeister, TJB Gelbvieh, Chickamauga, GA; 5th, BDCG DC Mary Lou 19P, BDCG Citizen F39L, Dawson Creek Gelbvieh, Easton, KS. Heifer calves, Mar. 10-30, 2004 1st, TJB Tempo 494P ET, TJB Jagermeister, TJB Gelbvieh, Chickamauga, GA; 2nd, FGRG Patty 411P, EGL Fosters LO17, Forbes Gelbvieh Ranch, Arlington, SD; 3rd, SEPT Playfully Sinful P104, EGL Fosters LO17, September Farms of Franklin, NE; 4th, BOKG Precious Onix 487P, OGSG Master ONIX, Overmiller Gelbvieh, Smith Center, KS; 5th, PCCI Ms Ice 4013P, PCCI Black Ice 001, Pearson Cattle Co. Heifer calves, Mar. 1-8, 2004 1st, TJB Velour 488P, TJB Massterpiece 1, TJB Gelbvieh; 2nd, CK Crystal 401P, Elk CK Bronco 41, Britney Volek, Highmore, SD; 3rd, LJSA Rose Mary ET, BTI Red Alert 2077, Sannes Stock Farm, Crookston, MN; 4th, VAC Tequila's Gal, JRI PLD Free Agen, Victoria Carroll, Rome, GA; 5th, JOB Danell Black Ice 30P, Job Danell Diamo, Danell Diamond Six Ranch, Lewiston, MT. Champion Spring Heifer Calf: 3G Cowgirl Persistence, 3 G Ranch, Kendallville, IN. Reserve Spring Heifer Calf: BEAS 4002P, Shad Ludemann, Ft. Pierre, SD. Heifer calves, Feb. 13-27, 2004 1st, Miss Freedom 4126P, SLC Freedom 178F, Taubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, NE; 2nd, HFGC Miss Rebecca 34P57ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Hart Farm, Kansas City, KS; 3rd, 3G Promise Me Purple ET, SLC Freedom 178F, 3 G Ranch of Kendallville, IN; 4th, DMRS Whiskey Girl 427P, SLC Freedom 178F, Raile Gelbvieh, St Francis, KS; 5th, MTR Miss Peaches 796P, RAG MR Extra WO, MTR Cattle Company, Buffalo, WY. Heifer calves, Feb. 5-12, 2004 1st, EGL Autumn Red P039 ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 2nd, LJSA Ms Minnesota 403P, WAC Plaines ANC, Sarah Sannes, Crookston, MN; 3rd, EGLLeah Lynn PO18 ET, EGL Fosters LO17, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 4th, EGL Vanstone ET, EGL Fosters LO17, Kaycie Shearer, Canton, KS; 5th, WTSH Hilltops Pebbles, SLC Freedom 178F, Russell Family Livestock, Broooklyn, WI. Heifer calves, Feb. 1-4, 2004 1st, RMS Jilian 5P ET, JCGR Bar GT Louie, Ridinger Cattle Co., Kersey, CO; 2nd, EGL Lara P010 ET, EGL Fosters LO17, Eagle Pass Ranchm, Highmore, SD; 3rd, EGL Leah Rae P006 ET, EGL Fosters LO17, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 4th, TSGF Southern Jewl, KCF Bennett Land, T-Square Gelbvieh Farm, Mooresville, NC; 5th VAC Tequila's Freedom ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Victoria Carroll, Rome, GA. Heifer calves, Jan. 18-31, 2004 1st, Tau Freedom 437P, SLC Freedom 178F, Taubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, NE; 2nd, JGPG GCGF Barami 404P ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Goose Creek Gelbvieh, Marion, NC; 3rd, TJB Vasanti 442P ET, BTI Red Alert 2077, TJB Gelbvieh, Chickamauga, GA; 4th, KIT Carlie P15 ET, BTI Red Alert 2077, Carrie Ann Tilghman, Glasgow, KY. Heifer calves, Jan. 1-17, 2004 1st, RTRM Patty 98NP, SLC Freedom 178F, Megan Rea, Berthoud, CO; 2nd, DARC P401, XXB Titus 880K, Backward L Farms, Inc., Oxford, NE; 3rd, BTI Ruby 2204P ET, BTI Big Sky 2066K E, Hartland Farm, Stella, MO; 4th, BDCG DC Arata 39P5 ET, JRI PLD Free Agent, Dawson Creek Gelbvieh, Easton, KS; 5th, 3G Cowgirl Pearl 404P, JRI PLD Free Agent, 3 G Ranch, Kendallville, IN. Champion Winter Heifer Calf: EGL Autumn Red P039 ET, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD. Reserve Winter Heifer Calf: Miss Freedom 4126P, Taubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, NE. Yearling heifers, Nov. 5-13, 2003 1st, PLR Jaylen Rose 360N, BTI Red Alert 2077, Emilie Bibb, Mason, TX; 2nd, TWA DANI Dancer, RHRT Independent, Kelsie McEndaffer, New Raymer, CO Yearling heifers, Oct. 2-14, 2003 1st, CIRS Free Lady ET, SLC Freedom 178F, John R Shearer, Canton, KS; 2nd, BTI Sophie 2221N ET, BTI Red Alert 2077, Hartland Farm, Stella, MO; 3rd, KAKC JPTK FeeBee, JCGR Bar GT Mach, Keaton Kendrick, Palmyra, MO. Yearling heifers, Sept. 1-22, 2003 1st, BTI Vickie 2217N ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Little Bull Farm, Manchester, KY; 2nd, KIT Jenna N29, BTI Red Alert 2077, Kitley Gelbvieh of Flora, IL; 3rd, JCGR SEPT Guilty Pleasure 414, JCGR Bar GT Mach, September Farms, Franklin, NE. Champion Senior Heifer Calf: BTI Vickie 2217N ET, Little Bull Farm, Manchester, KY. Reserve Senior Heifer Calf: CIRS Free Lady ET, John R Shearer, Canton, KS. Yearling heifers, Aug. 17-21, 2003 1st, JRI Ms Red Alert 634N55, JRI Extra Exposure, T Bar S Cattle Co., Bennets Mill, MO; 2nd, JLAB Jenni's Morning Glory, EGL Fosters LO17, Jenni LuAnn Blackwell, Gibson, NC; 3rd, JNCC GDN Super Statement 3, Rag Super Sonic, Nowack Cattle Company, Owensville, MO. Yearling heifers, Apr. 1 - May 14, 2003 1st, VLK Destiny, BTI Red Alert 2077, Volek Gelbvieh, Highmore, SD; 2nd, KJLG Nautica, SLC Freedom 178F, Leonhardt Cattle Company, Lake Preston, SD; 3rd, BDCG Joanie 3N1 ET, JRI PLD Free Agent, Raile Gelbvieh, St Francis, KS; 4th, BNW Nightshade 3029N, BNW Gunslinger 1, Wilkinson Gelbvieh Ranch, Model, CO; 5th, JWBG Glamour Girl 50N, JWBG 2K Atomic R, Nine Bar Nine Gelbvieh, Meriden, WY. Yearling heifers, Mar. 5-8, 2003 1st, Mooreland Alexis N345, SLC Freedom 178F, T Bar S Cattle Co., Bennets Mill, MO; 2nd, EGL Anna N321, LWHF Fearless, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 3rd, TJB Not Too Bad, MAC Mr Valhalla, JP Triple K Farm, Palmyra, MO. Champion Intermediate Heifer Calf: VLK Destiny, Volek Gelbvieh, Highmore, SD. Reserve Intermediate Heifer Calf: KJLG Nautica, Leonhardt Cattle Company, Lake Preston, SD. Yearling heifers, Feb. 1-26, 2003 1st, EGL Rylee N024 ET, EGL Fosters LO17, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 2nd, Tau Ms Freedom America 367N, JRI Extra Maximize, Taubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, NE; 3rd, JRI Ms Phenomenal 8N7, JRI PLD Free Agent, Raile Gelbvieh of St Francis, KS; 4th, MTR Miss Foxy Lady 742N, SLC Freedom 178F, MTR Cattle Company, Buffalo, WY; 5th, HFGC Miss Roxanne 34N42, SLC Freedom 178F, Hart Farm, Kansas City, KS. Young heifers, Jan 5-24, 2003 1st, JCGR Bar GT MS 9N, JCGR Bar GT Dime, Anthony Webb, Raeford, NC; 2nd, SCCB Nikki N06, Elk CK Bronco 41, Dromgooles Heaven, Mason, TX; 3rd, DBRG Foxi Roxi 8N, Elk CK Bronco 41, David Rea, Berthoud, CO; 4th, JTKD Titania, XXB Titus 880K, Lacey McClayland, Fredonia, KS; 5th, DCJ Ms Reese 306N, BTI Red Alert 2077, Hillcrest Acres, Miller, NE. Champion Junior Heifer: JCGR Bar GT MS 9N, Anthony Webb, Raeford, NC. Reserve Junior Heifer: SCCB Nikki N06, Dromgooles Heaven, Mason, TX. Senior heifers, Nov. 22 - Dec. 31, 2002 1st, BABR Secret Crush, Elk CK Bronco 41, Wattis Ranch of Casper, WY; 2nd, VER Lee Ann 304M ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Adam Verner, Rutledge, GA. Senior heifers, Sept. 3-5, 2002 1st, ADDG Tequila Rose, LWHF Fearless, September Farms, Franklin, NE; 2nd, FGFS Kandy Kisses 22M, SLC Freedom 178F, September Farms of Franklin, NE. Champion Senior Heifer: BABR Secret Crush, Wattis Ranch of Casper, WY. Reserve Senior Heifer: VER Lee Ann 304M ET, Adam Verner, Rutledge, GA. Senior heifers, Jan. 21 - Nov. 12, 2001 1st, BTI Kali 2005K, LWHF Fearless, September Farms, Franklin, NE; 2nd, JPTK Miss Free Source, SLC Freedom 178F, Keaton Kendrick, Palmyra, MO. Champion Cow/calf: BTI Kali 2005K, September Farms, Franklin, NE. Reserve Cow/calf: JPTK Miss Free Source, Keaton Kendrick, Palmyra, MO. Grand Champion Cow/calf Pairs: JCGR Bar GT MS 9N, Anthony Webb, Raeford, NC. Reserve Grand Champion Cow/calf Pairs: SCCB Nikki N06, Dromgooles Heaven, Mason, TX. Bull calves, Mar. 29 - May 03, 2004 1st. MLLR 421P, GATZ Heavyduty P, Double K Cattle, Fredonia, KS; 2nd, Dahl Fully Awesome 103P, JRI Fully Loaded 2, D Bar D Gelbvieh, Hazelton, ND; 3rd, JDPD Rebel Yell 2133P, Spur Beretta 703, Dromgooles Heaven, Mason, TX; 4th, PCCI Paycheck 4071P, BEA Maxim, Pearson Cattle Co. Inc., Lake City, SD. Bull calves Mar. 1-14, 2004 1st, VLK Pl, BTI Red Alert 2077, Volek Gelbvieh, Highmore, SD; 2nd, BEA Vegas 403P, EGL Fosters LO17, Beastrom Gelbveih, Pierre, SD; 3rd, AHL Blackhawk, TJB Jagermeister, Poker City Ranch, Agenda, KS; 4th, GRU EASY STUFF 014P, JRI PLD Free Agent, Grund Beef Genetics of Sharon Springs, KS; 5th, KRSG GET 'ER DONE P05, LJSA Buster 239M, Prairie Hills Gelbvieh, Gladstone, ND. Champion Spring Bull Calf: VLK Pl, Volek Gelbvieh, Highmore, SD. Reserve Spring Bull Calf: BEA Vegas 403P, Beastrom Gelbveih, Pierre, SD. Bull calves, Feb. 17-28, 2004 1st, HFGC HF Roscoe 34P59 ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Hart Farm, Kansas City, KS; 2nd, DAR Prospector 3P ET, DAR Rawhide 201M, DAR Rasmussen's Gelbvieh, Webster City, IA; 3rd, Mr Beretta of 920 128P ET, Spur Beretta 703, Taubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, NE; 4th, TJB Geared Up 483P ET, DAR Rawhide 201M, TJB Gelbvieh of Chickamauga, GA; 5th, CIRS Ultra ET, EGL Guido K051 ET, Circle S Ranch of Canton, KS. Bull calves, Feb. 4-15, 2004 1st, XXB Broken Arrow 019P, EGL Guido K051 ET, Boehler Gelbvieh, Orleans, NE; 2nd, EGL Northern Wind PO 68 ET, EGL Northern EX, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 3rd, RTRM Headline 101P, JRI Extra Exposure, Megan Rea, Berthoud, CO; 4th, DMRS President 416 P, Spur Special Leg, Raile Gelbvieh, St Francis, KS; 5th, T Bar S Brick House 82P, WAM Stonewall, T Bar S Cattle Co., Bennets Mill, MO. Bull calves Jan. 9-22, 2004 1st, 3G Phantom 408P, FHG Flying H EXTR, 3 G Ranch, Kendallville, IN; 2nd, PMG Pegasus 01P, SLC Freedom 178F, M&P Gelbvieh, Odell, NE; 3rd, PMG Presto 06P, XXB Drew 565K, M&P Gelbvieh, Odell, NE; 4th, BDCG DC Quick Strike 81P, BDCG Citizen F39L, Dawson Creek Gelbvieh, Easton, KS; 5th, CIRS Foster's Lager ET, EGL Fosters LO17, Circle S Ranch, Canton, KS. Champion Winter Bull Calf: 3G Phantom 408P, 3 G Ranch, Kendallville, IN Reserve Winter Bull Calf: PMG Pegasus 01P, M&P Gelbvieh, Odell, NE. Yearling bulls, Oct. 9-13, 2003 1st, RAG Black Hawk 90N ET, Elk CK Bronco 41, Nowack Cattle Company, Bland, MO; 2nd, CIRS Prowler ET; SLC Freedom 178F, John R Shearer, Canton, KS. Two-year-old bulls, Aug. 3, 2003 1st, Flying H Special Forces, XXB Drew 565K, Flying H Genetics, Arapahoe, NE. Two-year-old bulls, June 18, 2003 1st, BNW McGraw 3143N, BNW Joshua, Wilkinson Gelbvieh Ranch, Model, CO. Two-year-old bulls, Mar. 14 - Apr. 9, 2003 1st, PCCI Northstar 3078N, BEA Maxim, Pearson Cattle Co. Inc., Lake City, SD; 2nd, PCCI 3161 N, TAU T G TY 313L, R&N Overmiller, Smith Center, KS; 3rd, EGL Garrison N060 ET, EGL Guido KO51 ET, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD; 4th, PHG Fighting Irish NO7, Prairie Hills Gelbvieh, Gladstone, ND; 5th, DCJ MR Bobby Rae 326N, DCJ Hillcrest Sir, Hillcrest Acres, Miller, NE. Champion Intermediate Bull: PCCI Northstar 3078N, Pearson Cattle Co. Inc., Lake City, SD. Reserve Intermediate Bull: PCCI 3161 N, EGL Guido KO51, R&N Overmiller, Smith Center, KS. Two-year-old bulls, Feb. 6- 8, 2003 1st, DRJ Full Exposure, JRI Extra Exposure, T-Square Gelbvieh Farm, Mooresville, NC; 2nd, HCW Git'er Done, EGL Guido KO51 ET, Barwick Gelbvieh, Orleans, NE; 3rd, SEGA Nitrus 722N, Spur Beretta 703, Top Notch Gelbvieh, Pierce, CO; 4th, MHD Rowdy 10N ET, BTI Red Alert 2077, M Heart D Gelbvieh, Stevensville, MT; 5th, ARPS Nickel Back, SLC Freedom 178F, Travis Arp of Arlington, WI. Two-year-old bulls, Jan. 2-26, 2003 1st, TALS Titan Two, XXB, Titus 880K, Backward L Farms, Inc., Oxford, NE; 2nd, AHL Trailblazer, BTI Red Alert 2077, Poker City Ranch, Agenda, KS; 3rd, TWA Sharp Shooter, JCGR Bar GT Louie, Anthony Webb, Raeford, NC; 4th, KKKG Nextra Free 115N, FHG Flying H EXTR, Triple K Gelbvieh, Bonner Springs, KS. Champion Junior Bull: DRJ Full Exposure, T-Square Gelbvieh Farm, Mooresville, NC. Reserve Junior Bull: TALS Titan Two, Backward L Farms, Inc., Oxford, NE. Senior bulls, Aug. 11, 2002 - Aug. 11, 2002 1st, BAR GT Flashback 410M ET, SLC Freedom 178F, Ridinger Cattle Co., Kersey, CO. Senior bulls, June 20, 2002 - June 20, 2002 1st, JDPD Rolex 151M, HAD Sleep Tight E, Dromgooles Heaven of Mason, TX. Senior bulls, Feb 1, 2002 - Feb. 1, 2002 1st, JRI Heavy Equipment 125M3, SLC Freedom 178F, Sannes Stock Farm, Crookston, MN. Champion Junior Bull: JRI Heavy Equipment 125M3, Sannes Stock Farm, Crookston, MN. Reserve Junior Bull: JDPD Rolex 151M, Dromgooles Heaven, Mason, TX. Grand Champion Bull: JRI Heavy Equipment 125M3, Sannes Stock Farm, Crookston, MN. Reserve Grand Champion Bull: JDPD Rolex 151M, Dromgooles Heaven, Mason, TX. Pair of calves 1st, 3 G Ranch, Kendallville, IN; 2nd, Taubenheim Gelbvieh, Amherst, NE. Produce-of Dam 1st, HFGCHF Roscoe 34P59 ET, Hart Farm, Kansas City, KS; 2nd, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD. Junior get-of Sire 1st, Eagle Pass Ranch, Highmore, SD.

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