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Friday, June 28,2013

Badlands bison plan driven by tourism

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
The park officials say expanding bison grazing in the park will make them more visible to tourists, but livestock producers say existing bison are poorly managed, often damaging fences and migrating onto private property..

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Friday, June 14,2013

Tornadoes wreak havoc on livestock producers

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
Many ranchers who survived the powerful tornadoes emerged from their cellars and basements to find their cattle and horses dead, badly injured or even vacuumed completely off their acreage by strong winds clocked at more than 200 miles per hour in some extremes.

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Friday, May 17,2013

How beef can compete

Higher prices bring higher expectations

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
“We got $10 in new spending over that 20 years; meanwhile our pork and poultry competitors got $110,” said Nevil Speer, an animal scientist at Western Kentucky University. “You can’t grow an industry without new revenue coming in, and we basically worked in a stagnant industry for 20 years.

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Monday, May 13,2013

11 vote against Interior secretary

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
As Interior secretary, succeeding Colorado’s Ken Salazar, Jewell oversees an $11.5 billion annual budget, 70,000 federal employees and nearly 30 percent of the entire U.S. land mass, including national parks and wildlife refuges. Interior’s policies also impact live stock.

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Friday, March 15,2013

Oil and gas boom fuels fracking concerns

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
The nation’s livestock industry can find itself at odds with the U.S. oil and gas industry with concerns about potential groundwater contamination caused by such “fracking,” which involves injecting highly pressurized fluids into subterranean shale formations to create new veins or fractures, improving recovery of underground oil and gas.

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Friday, March 1,2013

BLM names Nevada man as acting director

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
A Nevadan who served as a public lands, mining and wildlife advisor for U.S. Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid from January 2003 to January 2011 will be named acting national director of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), which manages 253 million acres, or one-eighth of the nation’s entire land mass, mostly in the West.

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Friday, February 22,2013

Wood waste for ethanol may replace “food for fuel”

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
Ethanol production now absorbs more than 40 percent of the annual U.S. corn harvest, or about five billion bushels a year, driving up the cost of corn. A federal Renewable Fuel Standard requires 10 percent of the nation’s gasoline supply come from ethanol.

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Friday, February 1,2013

Ethanol mandate not going away anytime soon

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
With Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Lisa Jackson resigning after four years, the president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) doubts the EPA’s corn-based ethanol mandate will be revoked soon despite a drastic reduction of corn available for cattle feed and a sharp spike in its cost.

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Friday, January 25,2013

Caution recommended when feeding spuds to livestock

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
With corn prices soaring and potato prices declining, more farmers and ranchers are feeding spuds to their livestock, but those attending a workshop at the 45th Annual Idaho Potato Conference were cautioned that cattle can choke or bloat if their potato consumption is not closely monitored and.

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Friday, December 21,2012

Hay theft and animal abandonment continue to rise

by Mark Mendiola - WLJ Correspondent
Missouri Farm Bureau President Blake Hurst said thieves are targeting large bundles of hay left out in fields to be harvested, hauling them off and selling them. With winter approaching and grass dying out in one of the worst droughts in decades, unguarded bales are tempting as the price of hay escalates.

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