Close
Home  All Articles
 
 
Monday, February 28,2005

Russia stock output down

by WLJ
Russia’s livestock output declined further this past January amid falling profitability, the latest report by the Federal State Statistics Service showed. The sector's output was down as the number of cattle and pigs continued to fall, the service said. The number of pigs was down 7.1 percent on the year to 16 million as of Feb. 1, while the number of cattle was down 5.8 percent on the year to 24.9 million. Meat production was up 3.1 percent on the year to approximately 500,000 tons in live weight, but 54.7 percent less than in December 2004, when slaughter levels are seasonally high. In 2004, Russia's meat output amounted to around 7.7 million tons, down 0.3 percent on the year, compared with a 4.9 percent rise in 2003. Russia's milk output was down 1.4 percent on the year to 1.8 million tons in January. In 2004, milk output stood at 32 million tons, down 4.2 percent on the year. The egg output last month was down 1.9 percent on the year to 2.8 billion. In 2004 the egg output totaled 35.6 billion, down 2.3 percent on the year. Russia's livestock sector was hit last year by high grain and feed prices after a relatively poor harvest in 2003. In addition grain and feed prices remained relatively high despite an ample supply from the 2004 harvest. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

Rice asks Japan lift beef ban

by WLJ
U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice raised the issue of Japan lifting completely a ban on imports of U.S. beef during a meeting on Saturday, Feb. 19, with her Japanese counterpart. Rice met with Nobutaka Machimura for bilateral talks. The Japanese understood U.S. concerns and were trying to accelerate procedures "and made a commitment the issue would be resolved," said a State Department official, on the condition of anonymity. Hatushisa Takashima, the Japanese foreign ministry spokesman, said beef imports came up in the talks and that Japan would make an effort to meet U.S. requests. Japan imposed a ban on U.S. beef imports in December 2003 after the U.S. discovered its first case of BSE, in a Washington state Holstein cow. Earlier this month a Japanese government panel took a step toward partially lifting the ban, but the decision still has to be approved by the government. The panel recommended that Japan begin importing U.S. grade A40 beef, which comes primarily from cattle aged 12 to 17 months. Although the panel's decision was welcomed by the U.S. government as an important step toward resuming trade, Japanese consumer organizations criticized the move, saying it was politically motivated. Before the bank, Japan was the most lucrative overseas market for U.S. beef producers, buying $1.7 billion in beef in 2003. The two sides tentatively agreed late last year to resume imports of beef products from cows younger than 21 months. Talks later stalled over how to authenticate the age of cattle. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

SeraCare to patent prion blood test in several countries

by WLJ
Biotech company SeraCare Life Sciences, Inc. is attempting to patent a blood test for the prions that cause bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and its human variants. A developer and provider of human and animal based diagnostic, therapeutic and research products SeraCare announced Feb. 24 that it has filed patent applications in the United States, the European Union, Japan and Australia for an Immuno-PCR test, a novel blood-based test for infectious prions, the proteins that cause Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD) or new variant CJD (nvCJD), disease in humans. SeraCare believes that the test, co-developed by Dr. Mark Manak, chief scientific officer of BBI Biotech, a division of SeraCare in Gaithersburg, MD, and scientists from the University of Maryland Institute for Human Virology, could represent a significant improvement in testing animals or humans for BSE and nvCJD, which was previously identified through post-mortem analysis of brain/spinal cord tissue. SeraCare intends to commercialize the test. That process should start by the end of this year. The Immuno-PCR test will enable the detection of the BSE-related protein in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, or nerve tissue by combining two well accepted testing methods: antigen capture and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), into a two-stage Immuno-PCR testing regimen. In the first stage, the BSE prion (essentially a deformed normal cellular protein) is isolated by binding with a highly specific antibody. The antibody/prion complex isolated in the first stage of the test is then used to amplify the detection signal in the second stage using the PCR process, creating a sufficient level of the signal to be measured. Michael Crowley, Jr., SeraCare's CEO, said, "We believe this test could prove instrumental in helping to protect the health care and global life sciences industries from the possible use of contaminated instruments or materials in a variety of procedures and processes. "In particular, we believe our customers will be able to use this test to certify that animal or human-based components of their diagnostic, therapeutic or cell culture products are prion-free. We believe such a designation would add value to their products while also serving to expand their potential addressable markets worldwide,” Crowley said. “Additionally, we believe the Immuno-PCR test could serve an important role in screening blood and organ donors worldwide for nvCJD, similar to PCR tests currently used for diagnosing hepatitis, HIV, and other viruses." — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

Rising temperatures can cause mold in wet grain

by WLJ
Stored wet grain will deteriorate rapidly as temperatures rise this spring, according to North Dakota State University Extension Service agricultural engineer Ken Hellevang. Corn at 24 percent moisture has an allowable storage time of about 130 days at 30 degrees, but only 40 days at 40 degrees and 15 days at 50 degrees. Therefore, 24 percent moisture corn needs to be dried using a high-temperature dryer before the grain warms, Hellevang said. The galvanized steel of a grain bin acts as a solar collector, so the grain near the south side and top of the bin will be heated to temperatures that exceed outdoor air temperatures. Use aeration to cool grain that has been warmed during late winter or early spring, Hellevang says. Run the fan during nights or cool weather periods. The fans should be operated only long enough to cool the grain. To estimate the amount of fan time required to cool a bin of grain completely, divide 15 by the airflow rate. For example, about 75 hours of fan operation will cool a bin using an airflow rate of 0.20, but only about 15 hours is required using an airflow rate of 1 cubic foot per minute per bushel (cfm/bu). Natural-air and low-temperature drying with an airflow rate of at least one cfm/bu can be used to dry corn at moisture contents up to 21 percent during the spring. Start the fans when the average air temperature is about 40 degrees. This normally occurs in early April. Little drying occurs at temperatures below 40 degrees. Hellevang recommends that drying be completed by mid-May to prevent the grain from deteriorating near the top. Corn at 21 percent moisture has an allowable storage time of about 75 days at 40 degrees, 40 days at 50 degrees and 20 days at 60 degrees. The grain temperature will be near the average air temperature while fans are running. Wheat at moisture contents up to 17 percent can be natural-air dried with an airflow rate of 0.75 cfm/bu. Normally, start drying in mid- to late April, when air temperatures average about 45 degrees. At 50 degrees, wheat at 17 percent moisture has an allowable storage time of about 130 days, and at 18 percent about 90 days. At 60 degrees, the allowable storage time of 17 percent wheat is about 75 days, and at 18 percent is about 50 days. Some of the storage life will have been used last fall, so the allowable storage time this spring will be less than allowable storage time charts indicate. Immature and lower quality grain is more prone to deterioration than good quality grain, so it should be dried to a moisture content about 1 percentage point lower than good quality grain, Hellevang says. It also needs to be monitored more closely than good quality grain. Stored grain should be checked every two weeks during the spring and summer. Remember to apply the temperature correction to moisture readings when checking the grain moisture content. If the grain temperature is below the operating range for the moisture meter, usually about 40 degrees, place the sample in a sealed container and warm it to room temperature before measuring the moisture content. Grain should be kept below 30 degrees during late winter, and then below 40 degrees as long as possible. A 10-degree temperature increase cuts the allowable storage time approximately in half. In addition, insects are dormant at temperatures below about 50 degrees. Since a temperature increase may be an indication of grain deterioration or an insect infestation, check the grain temperature in several locations. Aeration fans should be covered to prevent warm, moist air from being blown into the bin, Hellevang said. Since the wind blows more during the daytime than at night, the warm wind will heat the grain to temperatures near the daily high temperature if the fan or aeration duct is uncovered. This will increase the potential for insect infestation and grain spoilage. In addition, moisture from warm, damp air that enters the grain bin may condense on grain near the aeration duct or perforated floor. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

Some Americans fear contracting BSE

by WLJ
A recent survey indicates that some U.S. consumers are starting to show some hesitancy when it comes to both purchasing and eating beef due to fears that they could contract the human form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). According to a Harvard School of Public Health survey, 16 percent of Americans have stopped ordering beef at fast food restaurants, 14 percent have stopped browsing the beef section in the grocery store and 27 percent think the human form of BSE has infected someone in the U.S. “Perception is the biggest problem,” said Jim Lamb, a BYU-Idaho Animal Science professor. “There has never been a case in the United States that originated in the U.S.” BSE attacks the central nervous system of an animal, causing it to slowly deteriorate. In humans the disease is called variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease and has similar symptoms. To catch the disease one would have to eat infected tissue. In animals and human beings, the symptoms usually do not show for many years. “The problem is that it takes a while to develop,” Lamb said. “A cow could have it for five years before any problems appear.” With the number of reported cases rising, the United States Drug Association released a list of countries that had a minimal-risk of spreading the disease to the U.S. at the end of 2004. Among those on the lists was Canada, which recently confirmed two other cases of BSE since the beginning of the year. “It (the list) places Canada in the minimal-risk category,” Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns said in a press release. “We remain very confident that the public health measures that Canada has in place to prevent the spread of BSE provides the protection to U.S. consumers and livestock.” During the 1980s, widespread BSE cases became a problem in the United Kingdom and the out-break is still affecting people in various countries. There have been reported 143 cases of people contracting the disease in the United Kingdom, according to worldwide interviews. A Japanese man who died of the disease recently is believed to have contracted it while in Britain during the 1980s. “I made several trips to England while on my mission during the time that BSE was coming around,” Lamb said. “When I go to give blood, they ask questions about when I was there, and sometimes I can’t give blood. They are being very careful.” Steps are now being taken to keep potentially infected animals out of America. Random samples from cows are sent to labs for testing and any animal that shows the smallest symptom of BSE is removed from the market. With new procedures and checks being enforced by the USDA and other organizations, Lamb believes BSE and vCJD do not pose an extreme threat to the United States. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

Test Reports

by WLJ
Treasure Bull Test Treasure Bull Test has now completed 100 days of their test on 175 Angus bulls consigned by breeders from eight states. Considering the very cold weather the first two weeks of January, the bulls are performing extremely well. The 144 spring Angus bulls on test are gaining 3.08 lbs. per day (with an average weight per day of age of 3.18 lbs. The 371 fall bulls have an ADG of 3.20 and post WDA of 2.80. The test is being conducted at the Broken O Ranch Feedlot, Simms, MT. The top gaining bull at the 100 day mark continues to be Lot 189, a bull owned by Harrison Angus Ranch, Doug & Jason Harrison, Boyd MT on a 1,325 lb. son of HARB Big Top 2000 JH with an ADG of 4.15 lbs. per day. The second top gaining bull is Lot 204 from Ox Bow Ranch, Ken Cook, Manager, Wolf Creek, MT, on a 1,355 lb. son of Hyline Right Time 338 with an ADG of 4.10. Third is a Youth consignor, Katrina Dubs, Billings, MT, on Lot 19, a 1,425 lb. son of JR Something Special with an ADG of 4.05 Other top gaining bulls include: Dalbey Angus, John Dalbey, on Lot 177, a 1,375 lb. son of B/R New Frontier 095 with an ADG of 4; Rocky Mountain Angus, Cal Kinney, Weiser, ID, on Lot 119, a 1,300 lb. son of Rito 111 of 2536 Rito 6I6 with an ADG of 3 85; Linhart Angus, Mardi Linhart, Lewistown, MT, on Lot 192, a 1,205 lb. son of Bon View New Design 878 with an ADG of 3.85; Rich Love, Great Falls, MT, on Lot 126, a 1,390 lb. son of Hyline Right Time 338 with an ADG of 3.80; Bee Haven Angus, John Katovich, St Maries, ID, on Lot 164, a 1,230 lb. son of Paws Up Alliance 9561 with an ADG of 3.75; Roal Angus Farms, Richland, WA, on Lot 209, a 1,230 lb. son of Rathbun Freightliner L578 with an ADG of 3.75 and Roals’ on Lot 212, an 1,195 lb. son of Rathbun Freightliner L578 with an ADG of 3.70. Leading all bulls in the weight per day of age category is lot 19 from the Jackpot Division consigned by Youth consignor Katrina Dubs, Billings, MT, on a 1,425 lb. son of JR Something Special with a WDA of 3.91. Second top WDA bull comes from Granger Angus, Jim and Beth Granger, Great Falls, MT, on Lot 4, a 1375 lb son of Hyline Right Time 542 with a WDA of 3.70. South Peak Angus, David and Nola Anderson, Geyser, MT, own the third top WDA bull on Lot 219, a 1,200 lb. son of SPAR Updates Spade with a WDA of 3.67. Other top WDA bulls include: Ox Bow Ranch on Lot 204, a 1,355 lb. son of Hyline Right Time 338 with a WDA of 3.66; Harrison Angus Ranch, Boyd, MT, on Lot 189, the top gainer sired by HARB Big Top 2000 JH with a WDA of 3.66; Rich Love on his Lot 126, a 1,390 lb. son of Hyline Right Time 338 with a WDA of 3.60; South Peaks on Lot 218, a 1,260 lb. son of SPAR Oscar Black Sambo with a WDA of 3.53; Milk River Genetics, Kathy Creighton Smith, Chinook, MT, on Lot 199, an 1,185 lb. son of SAF 598 Bando 5175 with a WDA of 3.53; Dalbey Angus on Lot 177, the 1,375 lb. son of B/R New Frontier 095 with a WDA 3.49 and Corey A Ranch, Barbara Korenjak, North Plains OR, on Lot 224, a 1165 lb. son of AAR Really Windy 721. The top gaining sire group comes from Ox Bow Ranch, Ken Cook, Manager, Wolf Creek, MT, on three sons of Hyline Right Time 338 with an average weight of 1,240 lbs. and an average daily gain of 3.38. The second top gaining sire group are three sons of Leachman Boom Time consigned by 7 Bar Heart Angus, Greg and Aimee Hachigian-Gould, Ulm, MT, with the three bulls averaging 1,203 lbs. each and having an ADG of 3.25. The top weight per day of age sire group comes from Milk River Genetics on three son of SAV 598 Bando 5175 with an average weight of 1,137 lbs. and an average WDA of 3.44. A very close second is the top gaining sire group from Ox Bow with a WDA of 3.43. Leading the 31 fall bulls in average daily gain is lot 325, a 1,455 lb. of Paws Up Royce 1519 with an ADG of 4.55. The bull is consigned by J&J Livestock, Augusta, MT. Second is an another J&J bull on Lot 322, a 1,535 lb. son of Bon View New Design 1407 with an ADG of 4.30. Third is Lot 329, a 1,545 lb. son of HSAF Traveler 8180-504C with an ADG of 4.1 Topping the fall bull division in weight per day of age is lot 329 from the Nissens with a WDA of 3.18. The bull is sired by HSAF Traveler 8180-504C. The Lot 322 from J&J is second in WDA with a WDA of 3. 15. This bull is sired by Bon View New Design 1407 and weighs 1,535 lbs. The third top WDA bull is Lot 331 from Nissen & Corey A on a 1,525 lb. son of HSAF Traveler 8l80-504C with a WDA of 3.06. Treasure Bull Test bulls sell April 11, at Western Livestock Auction, Great Falls, MT. For additional information call 406/264-5694 or e-mail brtangus@3rivers.net. OPSU bull test final Beef bulls on the 53rd Annual Performance Test at Panhandle State University, Goodwell, OK, were weighed-off test Jan. 29, 2005. Bulls in this year’s test have an overall average daily gain (ADG) of 4.15 pounds and a weight-per-day-of-age (WDA) of 3.38 pounds. The top performing bull is an Angus senior-age bull consigned by Larry Weinkauf, Orlando, OK. This son of SAF New Design K500 gained 6.32 pounds-per-day and has a WDA of 3.76 pounds. Preparations are in progress for the 53rd Annual Performance Tested Bull Sale where the top 70 bulls will be offered for sale. The bulls are being fertility checked, measured for frame score, scrotal circumference and scanned for fat thickness, ribeye area and marbling. Carcass trait EPDs will be available on many of the bulls sale day. Following close behind the top gaining bull is another Angus at 5.85 pounds consigned by Al Rutledge, Stillwater, OK. This bull is sired by Bon View New Design 1407. Another Larry Weinknuf bull by the New Design 500 sire is the third top senior with an ADG of 5.51 pounds. Al Rutledge’s pen of three Angus with an ADG of 5.15 pounds leads the senior pen division. Two of these bulls are sons of Bon View New Design 1407 and one is by TC Moonshine 001. B&M Angus, Edmond, OK, is in second place with an ADG of 5.03 pounds on three Angus, two sired by ALC Royce 0143 and one by RR Rainmaker 8153. In third place with an ADG of 4.91 pounds is Larry Weinkauf’s pen of three Angus, all by the SAF New Design K500 sire. An Angus bull of Tim Meier, Hitchcock, OK, leads the junior age bulls with an ADG of 5.33 pounds. This bull is sired by GAR New Design 9391. Phil Light, Turpin, OK, has the second, third, fourth and fifth ranked juniors with ADG’s of 5.13, 5.04, 4.93 and 4.88 pounds respectively. His top bull is a son of Summitcrest Hi Flyer 3B18. A Phil Light pen of three Angus leads the junior pen division with an ADG of 4.74 pounds. Two are sons of Millers Bullseye J373 and one a son of Bon View New Design 878. Tim Meier’s pen of four Angus, all sons of GAR New Design, is in second place with an ADG of 4.72 pounds. Another Phil Light pen of four Angus is third with an ADG of 4.61 pounds. Sires represented in this pen are: Gardens Highmark A09 S1, GAR Precision 9296, Summercrest Hi Flyer 3B18 and PL Traveler T 510 682. The most efficient junior-age pen of bulls in converting feed to gain is Phil Light’s pen of three Angus at 6.13 pounds of as-fed feed per pound of gain. The leading senior-age pen of bulls is AI Rutledge’s pen of three Angus at 7.25 pounds of as-fed feed per pound of gain. The sale is Wednesday, February 23, at 1:00 pm CST, in the England Activity Building, University Farm, Goodwell, OK. For complete test results and sale catalog contact Jerry or Gwen Martin, OPSU, Goodwell, OK 73939, 580/349-1500 or 580/349-1512. WCA/WSU 80 day bull test The 12th Annual Washington Cattleman’s Association (WCA) and Washington State University (WSU) sponsored bull test has issued a progress report for the first 80 day test period of their 120 day feed test. The test is being conducted at the Washington State University Research Center at Prosser, WA. One hundred thirty-six bulls will be tested this year comprised of Angus, Red Angus, Polled and Horned Herefords, Simmentals, and for the first time, Braunvieh. These bulls represent the top genetics from 47 of the Northwest’s top seed stock producing herds. A high percentage of the bulls on test are sired by the top nationally known AI sires. These bulls range in age from Jan. 1, 2004 to Mar. 31, 2004. Final test data will be taken Mar. 4, 2005. Sale day is scheduled for Mar. 23, 2005 at the WSU Research Center in Prosser, Washington. Only 75 percent of the bulls of each breed will be allowed to sell, based on the Test Final Station Index (Ĺ ADG and Ĺ Adjusted Yearling Weight Index), structure, physical and breeding soundness evaluation. A low birth EPD section for Angus will be separated after final EPD qualifications of +2.0 BEPD or less are checked. Angus (ADG-4.01, WDA-3.32) The 68 head of Angus recorded an ADG of 4.01 lbs. as a group. Thirty-four head of Angus have gained over four pounds per day. They were led by a Feb. 3 son of GAR Expectation 4915 that is gaining 4.94 lbs. per day. This bull is consigned by Black Knight Ranch of Sedro-Wooley, WA. Black Knight also has the second top gaining Angus on a Feb. 2 son of Rito 616 that is gaining 4.88 lbs. per day. The next high gaining Angus was a Feb. 23 son of B/R New Frontier 095 consigned by Rhodes Angus of Independence, OR, gaining 4.83 lbs. per day. He was followed by the heaviest bull of the entire test, consigned by Shultz & Sons of Reardan, WA. This Jan. 27 son of Connealy Timeline weighed 1,405 lbs. on Jan. 22 while recording a 4.80 lbs. per day gain and the top WDA of the Angus at 3.89 lbs. Horned & Polled Herefords (ADG-3.35 WDA-3.16) The 19 head of Polled Herefords were led by a Jan. 15 son of KT Top Secret 1030 consigned by Linton Polled Herefords of Prosser, WA, that recorded an ADG of 4.23 lbs. The second top ADG for the Polled Herefords was a Mar. 7 son of LHR Madison 517-C26 consigned by Deets Polled Herefords of Bellingham, WA, that gained 4.08 lbs. per day. The highest WDA recorded was a Mar. 13 son of Remitall Keynote 20X consigned by Nordlicht Polled Herefords of Addy, WA, that posted a WDA of 3.86 lbs. The highest ADG for the 19 head of Horned Herefords was 4.08 lbs. per day on a Feb. 22 son of H5 500 Advance 897 consigned by Bird Herefords of Halfway, OR. This bull also recorded the top WDA of the Horned Herefords with a 3.63 lb. WDA. The second highest ADG by a Horned Hereford was 4.07 lbs. on a Feb. 10 son of CL 1 Domino 5131E consigned by Ottley Herefords of Quincy, WA. Red Angus (ADG - 3.43, WDA - 3.17) The 12 Red Angus bulls were led by a Feb. 1 son of Mabes Canyon consigned by Mabee Red Angus of Sweet Home, OR. This bull leads the Red Angus test with a 4.35 lb. ADG. He also records the highest WDA of the Red Angus with 3.79 lbs. The second top ADG of the Red Angus was 4.01 lbs. per day on a Jan. 25 son of BJR Make My Day 981 consigned by X Lazy B Ranch of Dayton, WA. Simmental (ADG-3.55, WDA 3.41) The 12 Simmentals were led with an ADG of 4.28 lbs. on a Jan. 30 black, polled son of Black Irish Kansas consigned by Schriever Simmentals of Molalla, OR. The second high ADG of the Simmentals was 4.06 lbs. recorded by a Feb. 20 black polled son of PVF-BF BF26 Black Joker consigned by Powerline Simmentals of Oregon City, OR. The highest WDA of the Simmentals was 3.95 lbs. This Feb. 10 black, polled son of PVF-BF BF26 Black Joker was also consigned by Schriever Simmentals of Molalla, OR. Of the 12 Simmental bulls on test, all are polled and black. Braunvieh (ADG-2.93, WDA 3.05) The Braunvieh breed is participating in the WCA/WSU test for the first time. This breed is led by a Feb. 11 polled son of Silver Bullet 5549 consigned by Mountain Valley Ranch of Fairfield, ID. This bull posted an ADG of 3.73 lbs. and WDA of 3.31 lbs. Only the top 75 percent of these bulls in each breed will sell. Selection is based on Average Daily Gain, Adjusted Yearling Weight, semen and scrotal evaluation and structural soundness. All bulls will have ultrasound data collected and available to the public, as well as Performance EPDs and most will have Carcass EPDs available. Of special interest will be the sale of lot 43, a Feb. 10 son of Twin Valley Precision E161. Consigned and donated by Rocky Mountain Angus of Payette, ID, the proceeds from the sale of this bull will benefit the Washington State University Livestock Judging Team. The sale is scheduled for Mar. 23 at the WSU Research Center in Prosser, Washington. Prior to the sale, a social hour and forum will be conducted the evening of Mar. 22 featuring Dr. Sally Northcutt, Genetic Research Director at the American Angus Association, speaking on “Selection Tools - The Index Approach.” Bulls on test may be viewed at any time at the WSU Research Center. Test results and sale catalogs for the Mar. 23 sale are available through Jean Smith, Benton Franklin Area Extension Educator, at 5600 E West Canal Place, Kennewick, WA 99336 or 509/735-355. Test data can also be viewed on line at www.prosser.wsu.edu/faculty/linton.htm. Northeast Colorado Bull Test, 77-day mark Northeast Colorado Bull Test Association’s (NCBTA) 29th Annual Performance Bull Test is through 77 days of the 120-day testing period. As a group, the bulls posted a 4.30 pound average daily gain (ADG) and 3.29 pound weight per day of age (WDA). The bulls will be weighed off-test Mar. 1 and 2. ADG and WDA ratios are calculated for each bull and averaged to calculate a test index. All bulls are compared within their own breed, with the exception of breed groups that have less than four bulls. These bulls are ratioed against the average of the entire group of bulls on test. A bull must post a test index of 95 or greater to be eligible for NCBTA’s 29th Annual Performance Sale, Saturday, Apr. 2. This year all of the bulls were tested for the Bovine Virus Diarrhea (BVD) persistently infected (P1) status and found negative. The bulls are put on test for 120 days at the Northeast Colorado Beef Improvement Center and fed a high-fiber, low concentrate diet. NCBTA’s goal is to develop bulls in a way that will allow them to express growth through genetic potential without developing excess conditioning or reducing fertility and longevity. The three top gaining bulls were from the Angus breed. The top ADG was 5.74 pounds for test number 82, from Steve Smith Angus, Lehi, UT. This calf was sired by the Angus bull Jaynbee New Design 036. Second, with an ADG of 5.66 was an Angus calving ease bull consigned by Kimmel Angus, Stoneham, CO, calf number 43, sired by Bon View New Design 1407. Dale Angus Ranch, Akron, CO, has the third top gaining bull with a 5.41 ADG. Test number 61 is sired by the Angus bull BT Ultravox 297E. In the Simmental breed group, test number 23 posted an ADG of 5.01 pounds, sired by Drake Stress Free, consigned by George Rober, Sedgwick, CO, was the top gaining bull. The eight Simmental bulls posted a 4.37 pound ADG with a 3.55 pound WDA. In the Hereford division the six entries gains averaged 3.65 pounds ADG and 3.05 pounds WDA, with the top ADG bull consigned by Roderick Polled Herefords, Lindon, CO. This calf, test number 35, was sired by Star Geronimo 335K, posted an ADG of 4.15, WDA 3.36 and a test index of 112. Thirteen head of Red Angus bulls averaged 3.90 pounds ADG and 3.21 pounds WDA. The X 7 Ranch, Merino, CO, consigned the top ADG and indexing Red Angus bull. This calf is test number 13 and was sired by Schuler 9160 1435L. It posted an ADG of 4.99 pounds a 3.56 WDA with a test index of 120. In the Crossbred division, Gordon Creek Ranch, Anton, CO, and Steve Smith Angus, Lehi, UT, have bulls gaining 4.16 pounds. The Gordon Creek Ranch bull, test number 112, is 75 percent South Devon X and 25 percent Red Angus, sired by Cimarron Apollo 222M. The Steve Smith Angus bull is a Balancer bull sired by Jaynbee New Design 036, test number 113. The four head of Crossbred bulls posted an ADG of 4.00 with a 3.13 WDA. Ft. Bridger Limousin, Ft. Bridger, WY, has the top gaining bull, test number 123, in the Limousin division. This Cole 140J sired calf has an ADG of 4.11 with a WDA of 3.38. The four head of Limousin bulls posted an ADG of 3.77 with a WDA of 3.04. The top performing bulls will be offered for sale in the 29th Annual NCBTA Sale, Apr. 2, at noon, at the Northeast Colorado Beef Improvement Center, adjacent to the Eastern Colorado Research Center. For more information or a more detailed copy of the test results, contact David Colburn at 970/522-3200, ext. 283, or write NCBTA, 508S, 10th Aye, Ste. #1, Sterling, CO 80751, or visit the web site at www.northeastcoloradobttlltcst.org.

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

USDA forum: 2005 beef exports seen rising without Asia

by WLJ
USDA economists expect 2005 U.S. beef exports to rise, even without a border reopening in Asian countries, USDA Chief Economist Keith Collins said last Thursday. Collins made his remarks while speaking to a gathering at USDA's annual Agricultural Outlook Forum. However, although trade with Mexico and other countries will grow in 2005, it still would be only a quarter of the level in 2003, before nearly all U.S. beef export markets were closed after finding an imported dairy cow in Washington state with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), Collins said. In addition to the beef export increases, stronger foreign economies and resumption of more normal trade with Russia and China likely will increase pork and poultry exports, Collins said. Pork exports were a record in 2004 and are forecast to be five percent higher in 2005, he said. Demand for U.S. pork has been strong in Asia and in Mexico where economic growth is good, and the weaker U.S. dollar is contributing to the strong performance estimates. What's more, export strength for pork should carry over into 2006, even as bans are lifted on beef because beef markets will be slow to rebuild and pork prices should be lower. Lower broiler parts prices, compared with mid-2004, are helping exports currently, Collins said, and trade issues with China have been ironed out. U.S. broiler markets are expected to continue growing, especially in a variety of smaller markets like former Soviet block countries and the Caribbean. On the home front, U.S. livestock markets have been quite strong. A comparison of per-capita meat consumption and the Consumer Price Index for all meat illustrates this well, Collins said. Prior to 1998, there was a standard supply-and-demand relationship of higher prices when supplies were tight and lower prices when supplies were high, Collins said. But after 1998, the relationship changed as production and consumption rose, while live animal and retail prices also rose. Despite BSE and the loss of beef export markets, cattle prices set a record high in 2004 when the cattle cycle bottomed and beef production was down 6.5 percent, he said. For 2005, with Canadian fed and feeder cattle expected to begin crossing the border on March 7, beef production is expected to rise 4.5 percent, and cattle prices could decline about two percent from the 2004 record-high price and be in the low-$80 range, which should carry over into 2006. Collins attributed that change to strong consumer demand for meat protein, improving restaurant and hotel business, improved diversity and quality of meat products and a better world economy. Once the backlog of Canadian cattle works its way through the system this year, beef production will be limited by tight cattle supplies, Collins said. Despite high hog prices last year, hog producers have been cautious about expanding, Collins said. In 2005, hog slaughter is expected to be only slightly larger than last year, with pork production up less than one percent. Hog prices will be lower in 2005, he said. Prices are forecast in the upper $40s per hundredweight but would still be nearly $10.00 higher than average hog prices from 1998 to 2003. Hog prices are likely to remain fairly steady next year, with a little larger increase in output than in 2005. Broiler production in 2005 is expected to be about three percent higher as producers respond to prices that stay relatively high, Collins said. Production is expected to expand two to three percent into 2006.

Read more
Monday, February 28,2005

USDA allocates $9.3M for disaster recovery

by WLJ
Agriculture Secretary Mike Johanns last Wednesday announced $9.3 million in Emergency Watershed Protection Program (EWP) funding for locally-sponsored watershed protection projects resulting from recent floods and other natural disasters such as tornadoes, fires, drought and hurricanes. The funding is currently set aside for 12 states hit by natural disasters the past few months. "The Bush Administration remains committed to enhancing the environment," said Johanns. "These emergency funds will help restore critical watersheds while responding to the needs of rural communities." Through EWP, USDA's Natural Resources Conservation Service provides technical and financial assistance to protect life and property threatened by excessive erosion and flooding caused by the sudden impairment of a watershed from a natural disaster. EWP projects provide sound erosion control measures that are economically and environmentally defensible. EWP funds address public safety and restoration efforts on private lands and are used to remove debris, restore eroded streambanks, re-seed burned areas and take related steps to mitigate threats to people and property from impaired watersheds. States receiving EWP funds are: State EWP Funds Alabama $360,000 Arizona $960,000 California $1,200,000 Illinois $65,000 Indiana $1,440,000 Mississippi $240,000 Nevada $1,500,000 Oklahoma $1,200,000 Pennsylvania $540,000 South Carolina $76,800 Tennessee $1,080,000 Texas $660,000 TOTAL $9,321,800 — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 21,2005

‘A40' agreed to by Japanese politicians

by WLJ
USDA cleared a second hurdle in trying to partially regain beef trade with Japan as the ruling political party in the Pacific Rim nation last Wednesday endorsed a proposal designed to verify the age of U.S. cattle eligible to produce beef for export. The move by a panel of Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) members helps move Tokyo a step closer to easing its 14-month-old import ban on American beef, which has kept U.S. beef from accessing Japan’s beef market. Prior to the LDP’s blessing, a panel of food safety and consumer health experts accepted a U.S.-proposed beef grading method that would accurately identify and separate cattle unlikely to have bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The LDP panel accepted that same conclusion last Wednesday. However, the final decision lies with the government's Food Safety Commission (FSC). LDP’s approval of a program was considered a “very good omen” by USDA sources who said the political party has been a vehement opponent of reopening the Japanese border to U.S. beef. Under the USDA proposal, U.S. beef would be allowed to be shipped to Japan if the cattle producing that beef fit a grading category known as ‘A40' or if they have a verifiable paper trail with date of birth information. A40 cattle are animals that can be proven to be between the age of 12-17 months, well within the 20-month-or-under restriction Japan is advocating. The determination of that age window is made through evaluating the carcass of the animal, particularly vertebrae and cartilage, USDA scientists have indicated. Japan tentatively agreed late last year to resume importing U.S. beef from cattle 20 months or younger. The two sides, however, had long argued over how to authenticate the age of cattle, but the latest meat grading system proposed by U.S. officials addresses that issue. According to Chuck Lambert, deputy under secretary for regulatory and marketing programs, the A40 proposal now needs to be ratified by Japan’s Ministry of Agriculture, Fishery and Forestry (MAFF) and Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW). Upon that being completed, Lambert said it is up to FSC to determine changes to domestic BSE testing policy and then work on changes to import regulations. “We still have two major (regulatory) steps to maneuver in Japan,” Lambert said. “We have given them the science and what appears to be an acceptable resolution to the situation, and we have to wait on their acceptance of that now.” A timeframe for the regulatory process was not known last week. Most USDA officials indicated that it would still be early summer before the first load of U.S. beef might be on its way to Japan. Prior to BSE being found in Washington state in December 2003, U.S. beef exports to Japan totaled $1.5-1.7 billion. — WLJ

Read more
Monday, February 21,2005

Agri-terrorism funding needed

by WLJ
Federal funding to help states prepare for and prevent terrorism aimed at food producers is less than adequate, an Iowa agriculture department official told members of Congress last week. “There's been almost insignificant funding for agriculture and we're seeing it reduced even more as we look at funds being diverted to the larger cities and away from rural states such as Iowa," said Jane Colacecchi, executive liaison to Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Patty Judge. Colacecchi told the Senate Agriculture Committee last Tuesday that Department of Homeland Security (DHS) officials have not included agriculture systems as critical assets needing protection from bio-terrorism. “Up until recently they were really talking about things that you could blow up, bricks and mortar," she said. She said agriculture production should be viewed as a system that includes everything from farms, manufacturing and processing plants and transportation/distribution of products. "If you look at the corn production or cattle production systems in Iowa, no single component of that system may be identified as a critical asset, but it's a multibillion dollar industry," she said. Failure to recognize agriculture production as a critical asset has caused a lack of funding to protect it, she said. “We really need to continue to voice a strong opinion in Washington in order to get funding to the agricultural states,” she said. “It's America's food supply and the government at the federal level has really done an inadequate job of identifying that as a critical asset.” Colacecchi and Iowa State Veterinarian Dr. John Schiltz updated the committee on the state's preparedness for animal disease emergencies. Plans have been developed for veterinarians around the state to be part of a disease reporting network, Schiltz said. The Rapid Veterinarian Response Teams would coordinate a response to an incident anywhere in the state. He said more than 200 veterinarians have agreed to be part of the group. Training sessions also have been held around the state to teach mayors, county supervisors, farmers and others in how to deal with and report an animal disease emergency. The Iowa Law Enforcement Academy has incorporated information about the role of local officers in an emergency, which could include isolating hundreds of animals and closing off large tracts of land, Colacecchi said. "The state plans and what we've done with the counties up to this level really does put in place what we need to do in order to respond, but we want to continue to fine tune those responses," she said. "I'm very confident in what we have in place so far. I just think there's always room to continue to build on those plans," she said. Additional food safety experts testified that additional homeland security funding needs to be given to all states with a heavy agriculture industry, particularly those with a very heavy focus on food manufacturing and processing. Extra funds for the heavy beef producing states of Texas, Nebraska, Kansas and Colorado was called a “major priority,” by several who testified in front of the committee.

Read more
 
 
User Box (click to open)
 
SEARCH IN WLJ
Sign up for our newsletter!
   
 
S M T W T F S
1 2 3 4
5 6 7* 8* 9 10* 11*
12* 13* 14* 15 16* 17* 18*
19* 20* 21* 22 23 24 25*
26 27* 28 29* 30 31*
 
 

© Crow Publications - Any reprint of WLJ stories, except for personal use, without permission, written consent and appropriate attribution is prohibited. 2008 Crow Publications. All rights reserved.